The King’s Speech – Review

27 Apr

I don’t really have a whole lot to say as in an introduction to my review for The King’s Speech, except for this little anecdote about the Academy Awards. I put my whole hope for Best Picture at the 2011 Oscars in Aronofsky’s Black Swan, even though I really didn’t think it would actually win. When The King’s Speech took Best Picture, I was pretty angry, still thinking that Black Swan should have won. This all took place before I actually saw The King’s Speech , and now that I have, my attitude is 100% changed.

Prince Albert (Colin Firth) has always had trouble speaking, especially with his stammer that makes it almost impossible for him to get a word out, but he’s been able to live with it for most of his life. When his father, King George V (Michael Gambon) dies and his brother Edward (Guy Pearce), because of his romantic interests, can’t reign as king, Albert is forced to become King George VI. Amongst the family troubles, King George is also staring Adolf Hitler and the impending WWII directly in the eyes, but has no voice to unify the people. Enter Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush), a speech therapist who will not stop until King George has overcome his speech impediment and the underlying fear, all with the support of Queen Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter).

Sometimes it seems that there are certain actors who are born to play a particular role. This is the case with Colin Firth who plays King George VI in a way that needs to be seen to be believed. When you’re watching a movie, and you forget that the character you see in front of you is an actor merely playing a character, then you know that it is a terrific screen performance. I not only felt that way about Colin Firth, but also about Geoffrey Rush, who plays George’s eccentric speech therapist to a tee. He also gets the chance to offer the audience moments of much needed laughter amongst the drama, and the chemistry between Firth and Rush is just fantastic.

Director Tom Hooper, who first caught my eye with his fantastic mini-series John Adams, does a superb job at visualizing the King’s emotions and nervousness through not only the structure and blocking of the scene, but also in relation to the camerawork, which was stunning especially for a historical drama piece such as this. The framing seems to ignore the Rule of Thirds and makes evokes the feeling of uneasiness, discomfort, and/or insecurity. This combined with the numerous close ups that slightly distort the image and the constrictive hallways that the King finds himself in, adds a great deal to the visual style. It’s a truly remarkable way to visualize the feelings of this movie and Hooper rightly deserved his Oscar for Best Director.

The real drama in this movie doesn’t come from the family turmoil or the impending war with Germany. The drama stems completely from the battles that King George must go through with himself and his own self acceptance, in order to defeat his impediment. Although the story of a man who must rid himself of a speech problem doesn’t sound all that exciting, the personal way that the story is told, combined with the “backbone” of the other subplots makes The King’s Speech a full and moving story.

If you haven’t seen The King’s Speech yet, it is absolutely necessary that you give it a watch. It doesn’t matter if you like action, drama, romantic comedies, or splatter horror. This film speaks to all people and will entertain even the most jaded of film goers.

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