Romero’s “Dead” Series – Day of the Dead

12 Aug

Romero’s Dawn of the Dead wasn’t as big of a box office hit as Night of the Living Dead, but both of them have achieved statuses as cult classics. The same can be said of the third film in this series from 1985, Day of the Dead, although it isn’t quite as popular as the other two for clear reasons. Even with some faults, this is still a quality zombie movie that offers the same Romero satirical horror.

 

Months after Dawn of the Dead, the future of the human race has gotten so hopeless that the remaining people are either nowhere to be found or living in underground bunkers. In one particular bunker, Sarah (Lori Cardille) is a scientist working with a group of people to figure out how people can realistically rid the world of zombies. Progress is hardly being made, except in Dr. Logan’s (Richard Liberty) attempts to domesticate a zombie named Bub (Sherman Howard). This lack of progress angers the soldiers who are protecting them, especially Capt. Rhodes (Joseph Pilato). Anger and tension flares as the base erupts into violence pitting the humans not just against zombies, but more against each other.

While Night of the Living Dead is memorable for its gritty horror and Dawn of the Dead is memorable for its brutal satire and violence, Day of the Dead is memorable for its interesting plot turns that change the way these zombies are looked at. This movie is very scientific, and I use this word loosely, in trying to determine what exactly the zombies are and what is driving them. This is very interesting and made me as a viewer try to understand the undead as they were.

 

For all the gore hounds, like myself, out there, this movie does a fantastic job at showing off some great gore effects. In Dawn of the Dead, a lot of the blood and gore were pretty cheesy, even though there were times that it was appropriately disgusting. The realism and “yuck factor” are greatly enhanced for this one, providing some of the most disgusting scenes this series has seen thus far. The problem is, we have to wait really long to see the cool stuff. There are some great gore shots in the beginning, but then there’s a huge gap before we see any really gross stuff.

Be prepared to have to sit through A LOT of talking. There are a few scenes of dialogue, and one painfully long monologue that made me roll my eyes more than once. I’m not saying that Romero shouldn’t have written in a monologue, but it just went on for way too long, to the point where I wasn’t even listening anymore. Same for the scenes where the scientists and soldiers are meeting to discuss their current situation. They talk for so long that they actually start saying the same exact things, just in slightly different ways.

 

Day of the Dead, despite it’s flaws in writing and pacing, is a great zombie film that brings new light to the way we understand the Romero zombies. Where the first film gave us rules on how to kill them, this film gives the audience ways to understand them, which may sound kind of silly but it’s really creative and interesting. Don’t start this movie expecting something that’s just as good as Dawn of the Dead. Instead, sit back and enjoy it for what it is: a cool zombie movie with good characters, a great villain, awesome gore, and lots of zombies.

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Romero’s “Dead” Series – Day of the Dead”

  1. Victor De Leon August 13, 2012 at 10:07 pm #

    good review. my least favorite of the first 3 but it has loads of merit. I just felt there was a bit to much exposition. great ending though.

    • myworldvsthemovies August 13, 2012 at 10:43 pm #

      i agree. still a really good zombie film with a great villain.

      • Victor De Leon August 13, 2012 at 11:25 pm #

        Yeah, Capt. Rhodes was brutal and talk about how Karma’s a bitch. he got what was coming to him.

      • myworldvsthemovies August 14, 2012 at 12:33 am #

        definitely ranks in my top 10 best death scenes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: