Renaissance – Review

14 Sep

It’s important for a movie to have style. Style gives a film a unique mark that separates it from all the rest. Unfortunately, it isn’t a rare thing that a movie will become so overly stylized that it detracts from its success. Case and point: Renaissance.

 

Paris, 2054. The city has become a maze of streets, railways, and alleys that are carefully monitored by law enforcement.Ilona Tasuiev (Romola Garai), an employee for the mega-corporation, Avalon, is kidnapped for an unknown reason. Enter Barthèlèmy Karas (Daniel Craig), a street wise cop hired to track her down by any means necessary. During his investigation, begins to work with Ilona’s older sister, the mysterious Bislane (Catherine McCormack), and soon discovers the the web of corporate and moral intrigue runs deeper than he could have possibly imagined.

Everything about this film is part of a recipe for success. The stunning visuals, the interesting plot points, and just the way the story unravels is cool to watch. Just like if you were making any type of food, too much of one recipe will start to overbear the rest of the flavor. This is the main issue with Renaissance. The visuals are so stunning and overdone that I started just looking at the movie rather than watching it.

 

Other than the overwhelming visuals, the story was just not involving at all. Things moved on before I got a chance to really process what was happening, and there was little to no explanation of things. The crazy black and white effects also put characters in such ridiculous shadow, sometimes, that I had no idea who I was really looking at, and then the scene was over. Great.

I’m a little bent out of shape about this movie because I really wanted to like it. There were times where I finally got adjusted to the animation and effects and then the scene would change. Once the scene changed I would get lost in the animation again and spend more time adjusting to the surroundings. Again, the animation is absolutely fantastic and very reminiscent of Sin City and A Scanner Darkly. Unfortunately, I was more into what the film looked like and not so much the story or the characters.

 

I feel like the story is definitely there. Like I said, there were times where I was really invested in what was happening onscreen, just not as much as I really should have been. The characters do have to make some interesting moral choices and there are a few good twists that had me legitimately surprised, but by the end of the movie, I was more than ready to turn it off and go do something else.

I can’t say that I’ve ever really had this problem before. Normally I really enjoy an overabundance of style in movies. Any Guy Ritchie (except one that will go unmentioned) has a crazy amount of style that, when mixed with the plot and characters, make the films worthwhile. In Renaissance, there was too much style and not enough good characters or plot elements. I’d definitely say check it out for the visuals alone, but there really is no need to see it twice.

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