Star Trek: The Next Generation Movies – Part 2

12 Nov

So here we have the final two movies in the Next Generation movie series. In the last review, I talked about Star Trek: Generations and Star Trek: First ContactGenerations was an acceptable entry into the series of feature films but didn’t really blow me away while First Contact was a rollicking good time and was exactly the kind of thing I wanted with this particular crew. This time, I’m going to look at Star Trek: Insurrection and Star Trek: Nemesis and see if they hold up to their predecessors.

Jonathan Frakes returned to the director’s chair after helming First Contact to make the 1998 film Star Trek: Insurrection.

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After Data (Brent Spiner) goes haywire while on a mission with Federation and Son’a explorers, Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) and the rest of the Enterprise travel to their location on an isolated planet. Their original mission was to study the quaint Ba’ku people, but upon recovering Data and repairing his positronic brain, it becomes clear that the Son’a and Admiral Dougherty’s (Anthony Zerbe) intentions are much more sinister. The leader of the Son’a, Ru’afo (F. Murray Abraham) along with Federation help is attempting to move the Ba’ku off their home planet in order to remove the healing properties from the rings around the planet which will make the land uninhabitable. Picard now faces a choice to either stay on the side of the Federation and its Admiral, or defy his orders and defend the peaceful Ba’ku from forceful relocation.

I see this movie get pushed to the side a lot because it feels too much like an extended episode of The Next Generation. I completely agree, but that doesn’t detract too much from it. While watching Insurrection, I wasn’t too impressed, but then I got to thinking and reading more about it and it’s actually better than people make it out to be. In this movie, we see Picard make a very difficult choice to defy the Federation that he loves so much in order to protect the rights of the defenseless Ba’ku. While this fits in with Star Trek highlighting real world issues in their science fiction universe, it also features a performance by Patrick Stewart that really shines.

Jonathan Frakes, who also plays Will Riker, is back directing this one since his work on First Contact proved very effective. While it isn’t as sharp as First Contact was, Insurrection is a still a visually exciting film with the special effects and performances you’ve come to expect with Star Trek. I have to give special attention to the make up work on the Son’a. Their skin one their faces being pulled all the way back makes them a horrifying villain to look at, and F. Murray Abraham’s performance as Ru’afo just solidifies their coolness in my mind. For a villain we’ve never seen before, they definitely make an impact.

Star Trek: Insurrection isn’t one of the best Star Trek films, but it’s certainly not as bad as The Final Frontier. This movie definitely feels like a long episode of The Next Generation, but that just means it feels like another adventure with a crew that I’ve come to know very well. I can’t really complain about that. Some parts do tend to drag and there are a few story arcs that lead to nowhere, but the action, characters, and special effects all work in the movie’s favor along with the choices Picard and the others have to make.

Final Grade: B

In 2002, the adventures of the crew of The Next Generation finally came to an end with Star Trek: Nemesis.

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After the assassinations of multiple members of the Romulan Senate, a new Praetor is put into power. As a result, the Enterprise is ordered to Romulus on a diplomatic mission to see that this exchange of powers goes over smoothly with the new Praetor being of Reman descent, which is the race that the Romulans use as slaves and cannon fodder. The new leader is in fact a human named Shinzon (Tom Hardy) who has a very special and unsettling connection to Captain Picard. When it becomes clear that Shinzon is only using his new power to not only conquer Romulus, but also Earth, Picard and the crew of the Enterprise begin a hopeless fight against Shinzon’s technologically superior flag ship. With the fight growing bleaker by the second, Picard is forced to use drastic measures that pushes the limit of his ship and crew.

After 7 seasons of the show and 4 movies, it’s clear by this point that this particular series is running out of steam. I have to say, though, Nemesis insures that these characters that people grew to love so much really get a send off. Unfortunately, this send off is very under appreciated and I feel like I’m in the minority of people that really liked this movie a lot. After First Contact, I think this movie is the best of The Next Generation films. There’s plenty of action and excitement, and despite a budget that wasn’t too great, there are some really cool special effects. The last 45 minutes or so is a space battle that really gets the heart pounding, and it highlights various members of the crew who each have their own time in the spotlight. Finally, there’s a moment in this movie that is one of the most heartbreaking in the entire franchise.

Star Trek: Nemesis is a very exciting movie that is full of action and really gives closure to these characters. The main cast are all great and perform like they always have. The best new addition is definitely Tom Hardy as the villainous Shinzon. He just oozes corruption and yuckiness while also appearing pathetic and sickly. This isn’t a perfect Star Trek movie. Leave that to The Wrath of Khan, but I will say it’s a damn entertaining one and it’s, in my own opinion, a great send off to the crew of The Next Generation

Final Grade: A-

With this series finally at a close, it’s pretty nice that there aren’t any real stinkers in the mix. A few of these movies are better than others, but none of them fall into the pit that was created by The Final Frontier. For fans of this franchise, all of these movies are worth a watch on some level. Live long and prosper.

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