Tag Archives: andy garcia

The Untouchables – Review

5 Oct

The 1930s was an interesting time in American history. The Great Depression hit in 1929 which forced many people to make money to provide for themselves by any means necessary. Since this was happening during the time of Prohibition, a lot of these people used the demand of alcohol to their advantage. One of the biggest names was Al Capone, who built an entire empire and was one of the forerunners of organized crime in the United States. This leads me into Brian De Palma’s 1987 film The Untouchables, based on a book of the same name and a television show from the 1950s. With source material like this, it’s no surprise that this film has become one of the most respected gangster movies of all time and, I think, Brian De Palma’s best film.

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In the early 1930s, Al Capone (Robert De Niro) practically runs the city of Chicago and makes millions of dollars through the illegal distribution of alcohol. He’s also a dangerous and violent criminal who uses intimidation and murder to force people into doing business with him. This causes the Bureau of Prohibition to create a task force just to bring him down and choose Eliot Ness (Kevin Costner) to be the head of this group. Ness finds working with a whole task force to be dangerous and nearly impossible, so he makes up a team all his own. They are beat cop Malone (Sean Connery), new recruit George Stone (Andy Garcia), and accountant Oscar Wallace (Charles Martin Smith). The group is soon nicknamed “The Untouchables,” but they soon realize that’s not true as the pressure they put on Capone force him to put the pressure back on them.

I hate it when critics use the word “captivating” to describe a movie. It’s such a cheesy adjective and I simply don’t like it, but allow me to be a hypocrite just this once. The Untouchables is a captivating movie. Everything just comes together so well to make a movie that reminds me why I love movies so much in the first place. Normally I hate when a movie is based off true events and is completely inaccurate, but David Mamet’s screenplay makes me forget all that and just enjoy the story that he put together. With Mamet’s screenplay, Brian De Palma’s expert hand at directing, the cast, and Ennio Morricone’s note perfect and unique score, The Untouchables was practically sculpted by the gods.

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There’s a lot of great actors attached to this movie like Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Robert De Niro, and Andy Garcia. While everyone does a fine job, there are a few stand out performances that exceed great and wind up in the territory of excellence. These exceptions are Sean Connery and Robert De Niro. Now, De Niro isn’t really surprising, but I never really looked at Connery as a great actor. He can act fine, but his performance in The Untouchables is the highlight of his talent. He brings humor and the right amount of sincerity and drama to the role of Malone, which makes this movie worth watching just to see him act. D Niro, on the other hand, while not being in the movie all that much, makes every scene that he’s in memorable. He plays Al Capone with viciousness, slime, and makes him a very entertaining person to watch.

Like I said before, this movie is pretty far from being accurate. For example, Eliot Ness and Al Capone never actually met face to face during the whole ordeal, and Capone never actually violently attacked back. Also, Frank Nitti wasn’t involved in things like he was in this movie. But, this movie presents a stylized version of reality that makes it so hard to look away. Brian De Palma is known for making highly stylized, but not over the top films. There are scenes in this movie that will be remembered until the day I die, like the shootout on the bridge and the slow motion gunfight in the train station. These scenes combined with Morricone’s score just get to me in ways that movies should.

Brian De Palma’s filmography has had some rough patches, but also some that define film making perfectly. I love Scarface just as much as the next guy, but when it comes to mob movies that De Palma has done, my favorite has to be The Untouchables. It tells a story so perfectly with characters and their arcs so defined, that it’s easy to care about what happens to all of them. It also is reality through a stylish looking glass that shows a world like our own, but somehow just a little different. That’s the magic of the movies, and that’s why this film is a must see.

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5 Days of War – Review

14 Aug

I enjoy seeing movies that have conflicts or worldly events as their story lines because chances are that I remember them actually happening. In 5 Days of War, the worldly event that happens is the short war between Russia and Georgia, a conflict that wasn’t really covered in full because of the opening ceremonies of the Beijing Olympics. I still remember seeing some coverage, but not following the stories too well to know what was going on. After 5 Days of War, I still can’t say that I’m 100% about the incident because this is nothing more than lame propaganda.

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After being ambushed in Iraq and losing his friend, Thomas Anders (Rupert Friend) isn’t anxious to get back in the field. His job is dangerous, being a war reporter, but necessary to get the truth out in times of global crisis. After being talked into a trip to Georiga by his friend the Dutchman (Val Kilmer), Anders and his cameraman Sebastian (Richard Coyle) head over just in time to see the start of the violence between Russia and Georgia. While they are there, they witness and record a war atrocity and make it their mission to get it on the air despite being ignored by major news networks, all while protecting Tatia (Emmanuelle Chriqui), a Georgian woman who lost most of her family in the conflict.

The director of this film is Renny Harlin, who is most known for directing Die Hard 2Cliffhanger, and Deep Blue Sea. Now look at these movies, and think about the severity of the Russian-Georgian conflict. Taking a guy who directs mainly goofy action films and putting him in the directors chair for a film that is supposed to show a real life war with serious themes is not the best idea. It feels like part of the movie is there, but there are so many action clichés that pop up, it pulls you right out of the movie. These clichés also can be attributed to the awful screenplay.

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The screenplay. Oh, the screenplay. It may be more of an atrocity than what is depicted in the film. Ok, definitely not, but good lord. When I say it treats it’s audience like they’re a bunch of thirteen year olds who’ll believe anything they hear about anything, I’m being dead serious. First of all, haven’t the screenwriters, Mikko Alanne and David Battle, heard that when it comes to writing, less is more? There is so much expository dialogue and over decried scenarios that the dialogue feels more like a lecture than natural. Also, the clichés, which I have mentioned are terrible and would NEVER happen in a situation like this. Finally, the film makes the Georgians out to be peaceful angels who are being slaughtered by the evil Russian titans, thirsty for blood and power. Atrocities were done on both sides during the different conflicts between Georgia and Russia over the years. The Georgian propaganda is overwhelming and stupid.

Not all of this movie is bad, however. I will admit that there are some intense scenes that are pretty memorable. These are the times where the movie that this was supposed to be stands out. These intense scenes were accomplished well thanks to the cinematographer, Checco Varese, who was a news cameraman who recorded global conflict for many different news networks. As a guy who has been there and done that, the look of this movie is great and is really the only good thing about this movie

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5 Days of War is a stupid film that takes itself way too seriously, and ends up falling flat on its face. The propaganda is heavy handed and full of it, the characters are nothing special, and the story is clichéd and predictable. I can’t even say to check it out for the cool cinematography. It just isn’t worth it. There are better movies with this theme out there. Skip this movie altogether. It’s two hours of, for lack of a better word, bullshit.