Tag Archives: cat

Keanu – Review

24 May

Back in 2012 when Key & Peele premiered, I didn’t think the show was going to go anywhere or last long because of Comedy Central’s track record at the time. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele have cleverly weaved their way into a high status of pop culture thanks their subversive sketch comedy that is both funny and often smart. It was disappointing to see that their show was ending, but it seems that they have no intention of slowing down. Instead of a show, we now have a feature length comedy called Keanu. Much like their show, Keanu is a very subversive comedy that’s only made funnier by how over the top and silly it is willing to get.

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After his girlfriend abruptly dumps him, Rell (Jordan Peele) feels like his life is over. No longer does he have any drive or motivation to make something of himself, which worries his cousin/best friend, Clarence (Keegan-Michael Key). Unlike Rell, Clarence is a well adjusted adult with a wife and kids, who finds it a little bit silly when Rell regains his livelihood when a kitten shows up at his door and is named Keanu. All seems right with the world until Keanu is taken from right under Rell’s nose. Rell and Clarence find out the the man who took Keanu is a notorious drug lord named Cheddar (Method Man), a man who loves violence just as much as he loves cute kittens. The only way Rell and Clarence can get their cat back is to go undercover and assume the identities of two mysterious hitmen, earn Cheddar’s trust, and save Keanu.

The plot of this movie is absolutely absurd and that’s where a lot of the joy came from. There’s so much off the walls things that happen in this movie that you really don’t know what kind of joke they’re going to throw at you next. To me, that’s real comedy. Movies that rely on just sex jokes and being loud just aren’t my kind of thing. Keanu has a lot of really ridiculous jokes and situations while also working to turn certain stereotypes on their heads. You also gotta love the slow motion scenes of the little kitten running through gun battles and dodging all sorts of things. What’s also great is that they don’t just rely on the kitten as a funny little distraction. Keanu isn’t really in it all that much, so when he is it’s great, but there’s plenty of original, non-kitten related humor as well.

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One of the main reasons to even see this movie is just to see Key and Peele play off each other so well. One of the reasons their show was so funny was because of the crazy natural chemistry that they have. They also are great at playing the goofy characters. Peele’s Rell is a slacker with a good heart who really just can’t seem to do anything right, and Key’s Clarence is the polar opposite of what a gangster should be, which makes his scenes trying to fit into the gang world all the more hilarious. The way Key and Peele interact and talk with each other feels so natural, and there were a lot of times where it felt like a lot of what they were saying was unscripted. You really can’t have comedy without good chemistry, and the chemistry between these two comedians is off the charts.

While this movie is a comedy, it has plenty of action in it to. The most similar example of a movie like Keanu would have to be Pineapple Express, because of all the comedy mixed with the very well shot and choreographed action. Surprisingly, the action in Keanu is pretty badass. The climactic shoot out at the end is intense but still hilarious. There’s a lot of use of slow motion, but the slow motion is very well shot and framed uniquely. The film’s director, Peter Atencio, who worked on the duo’s show quite a bit, obviously has a skilled eye, and I’d like to see more from him.

It takes a lot for comedies to impress me and Keanu is one that made me laugh to the point of tears…multiple times. I honestly can’t say I’m too surprised by that. I’ve been fan of their comedy for a while now, but seeing it in as grand a spectacle as this was right on the money. Their satire is razor sharp and their delivery is fast and furious, which I think makes them two of the funniest people working in the business. If you like to laugh even a little bit, you have to make Keanu required viewing.

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House – Review

15 May

This may be one of the hardest reviews I’m ever going to have to write. House is a Japanese movie from 1977 that was directed by Nobuhiko Obayashi, who started as an experimental film maker and advertiser, but was asked by Toho to make a film that would resemble the American hit, Jaws. When Toho got House in return they were completely shocked and eventually pulled it from the theaters after it started doing well in the box office out of fear that people would think that this is the direction Toho would be going in. Is it as strange as this introduction has made it sound? Absolutely right it is, but that is just fine with me.

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Gorgeous (Kimiko Ikegami) is a Japanese school girl who invites her friends to come with her to visit her aunt’s (Yōko Minamida) house in the country. Her friends are appropriately named Prof (Ai Matsubara), Melody (Eriko Tanaka), Kung Fu (Miki Jinbo), Mac (Mieko Sato), Sweet (Masayo Miyako), and Fantasy (Kumiko Oba). Each girl’s name represents their different personalities. When they arrive at the house, they all get the grand tour and are very happy with what they see, all of them looking forward to their stay. Unfortunately for them, on the first night strange things begin happening and one by one they all start to go missing. The house turns out to haunted by the strangest apparition you may ever see on film.

I really can’t give a a summary of this movie and make it sound interesting. It’s a very cut and dry narrative to look at written out. On the surface, it would seem like a stereotypical haunted house movie. That couldn’t be further from the truth. This is a head trip, psychedelic experience, horror film, and dark comedy all mashed together in one film. There’s a piano that eats people, a cat portrait that shoots gallons of blood across a living room, a pair of disembodies legs causing all sorts of mayhem, and of course, my personal a favorite: a giant head that comes out of nowhere with a warning to the terrified girls.

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The real draw to this movie is the in camera and analog effects that Obayashi exploits. He really does not hold back when it comes to showing off what he can do. What one needs to remember when they are watching House is that it is from 1977. A lot of the shots outside used matte paintings to make the world that these girls inhabit very surreal and other worldly. The images seem almost too beautiful and artificial to be real, and that’s because they absolutely are. A lot of the effects are also done with a blue screen which are very obvious to notice. Normally, this would be a detraction, having special effects that look unreal. For this movie, however, it works just fine. Nothing about this movie is supposed to look ordinary, so the effects look very cartoonish and silly. This adds to the whole dream like vision that Obayashi wanted, even though he even said he wasn’t too thrilled with some of the effects. I personally loved them.

For the times where there wasn’t a crazy special effects happening, there was at least one or two boring scenes of the girls just sort of hanging out. This makes the movie feel a lot slower than it should feel, especially with the subject matter of the movie. This could be on account of sloppy writing, since some of the jokes seem to stretch on too long or there are plain and simply scenes where nothing really happens. Another contributing factor to the pacing may be that there are scenes that are so ridiculous that when it slows down, the change almost seems jarring. One second, possessed mattresses are attacking someone, and the next the characters are sitting around talking and laughing. It feels weird to me.

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House truly is a one of a kind movie for better or for worse. Some people will call this a masterpiece when it comes to cult classics. Others will say that it shouldn’t even exist and that it’s a blemish on the history of film making. Personally, I don’t see how you could possibly ignore this. It isn’t perfect, but then again it isn’t really anything that can be classified or labeled. It simply exists, and it is up to the viewer to decide what they make of it. Trying to say that it’s good or bad wouldn’t be doing the film justice. House is just House, nothing more and nothing less.