Tag Archives: CIA

Atomic Blonde – Review

2 Aug

In 2012, a graphic novel was released called The Coldest City, which tells the story of a spy operating in Germany during the events that lead up to the fall of the Berlin Wall. I have to be honest, up until recently, I’ve never heard of it, but it’s now been brought to my attention with its new big screen adaptation titled Atomic Blonde. I’ve been looking forward to this movie for quite a while, but I knew that it could really go either way, so I’d like to say I had my expectations in check. After seeing it, I have to say that I’m pretty surprised at a few things. First off, it’s a better movie than I thought it was going to be, which is pretty cool. Secondly, the marketing for this movie is completely off and it’s really not at all what the trailers make it out to be.

The year is 1989 and the Berlin Wall is close to falling which will bring together people on either side for the first time in years. Meanwhile, amidst the government turmoil, MI6 agent James Gasciogne (Sam Hargrave) is killed by a KGB agent and the microfilm containing the names and actions of every agent in operation is stolen from him. This concerns a lot of people and only the best of the best can be trusted to go in and retrieve this information before it is sold to the highest bidder. Enter Lorraine Broughton (Charlize Theron), a top level MI6 agent with a very special connection to the deceased. Her mission is to not only retrieve the microfilm, but also hunt down and assassinate a traitor known only as Satchel, who’s been selling information to different sources including a KGB associate and arms dealer named Bremovych (Roland Møller). Upon arriving in Berlin, Broughton meets with another agent, David Percival (James McAvoy) who’s been operating in Berlin for a long time, but as she spends more time with Percival and his associates, it becomes clear that no one can be trusted and people can be bought and sold no matter their previous allegiances.

The trailers for this movie made it seem like Atomic Blonde was going to be a non stop, kinetic thrill ride of a movie that relentlessly jumps off the screen and attacks the senses of the viewer. That’s not really what the movie was and after I adjusted to this realization I started to really enjoy the movie for what it was. Sure, there’s action in it, but this is more of a spy movie than anything else, that just so happens to be infused with the style and sensibilities of a graphic novel. It does feel over the top in terms of its characters and certain plot elements but it also feels down to earth at other moments. This is a really layered story, and covering anything in a paragraph long summary is just impossible. What really is done right with this movie is a sense of blurred motivations and it’s appropriate that this line of work is constantly referred to as “the game” because the film makers have turned this area of Berlin into something resembling a game board. The characters move about in certain areas as clandestine as possible while trying to weed out the actions of the other characters. It’s a web of deceit and lies that holds up until the very last frame of the movie and this tale of suspense and turncoats works just as well as the action sequences.

Over the past few years, Charlize Theron has proven that she can perform just as well as the other modern day action movie titans. She was great in Mad Max: Fury Road, but her performance in Atomic Blonde takes her skills to the next level. When the movie does shift gears into pure action mode, it gets nuts. There’s a few major action sequences throughout the film, and the wait building up to each of them is worth it with the payoff. Theron owns the screen in these sequences and the choreography of each of these scenes are unique and memorable. It’s also all shot very well so the action can be seen in full. A while into the movie, one of these sequences starts and appears to not break action for at least 10 or 15 minutes. This is one of the greatest action sequences I have ever seen, and despite the fact that it is edited together, the illusion is strong and I didn’t have a hard time believing it was one continuous shot. Major kudos goes to director David Leitch. This being his first full feature film, I am really surprised by his skill behind the camera and I can’t wait to see what else he has in store for us.

While Atomic Blonde does very well in most areas, I do have to touch on some problems that I had with the movie. The pacing of this movie does have a hard time at some points. There will be a hard hitting action sequence, but then it will feel like the plot hits a brick wall. This kind of stop and go narrative is jarring and there’s a whole plot line with a certain character that could have been left out all together. The movie is a good length but it would have worked better if the screen time with this particular character was spent building on something else. There’s also a bit of a weird clash of style and story. This is a very stylistic movie, but it also tells a very down to earth and real story. It often felt like the style and the substance were contradicting each other, which shows that Leitch does have some growing to do in how he presents his stories.

Atomic Blonde is not a perfect movie but it is a more than competent action/spy thriller that has a whole lot of style and some really great film making. As a debut feature film, it’s really impressive and I want to see David Leitch grow as a film maker. While he shoots action very well, he needs to work on elements of his story telling and his style before he can create a movie as hard hitting as I think he wanted Atomic Blonde to be. Still, this is a very entertaining movie with a great sense of location and plenty of suspense and action to keep audiences on the edges of their seats.

Final Grade: B

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The Bourne Series – Review Part II

28 Jan

Let’s get back to the Bourne series. In the first review, I stated that The Bourne Identity has been one of my favorite action films since I can remember, and that The Bourne Supremacy is a flawed but worthy sequel. Now we have The Bourne Ultimatum and the most recent entry, The Bourne Legacy. This is going to be a very conflicting review because one of these movies is quite frankly one of the best action movies ever made, and the other is an unnecessary mess that made me feel like I wasn’t even watching a Bourne movie. I think you could guess which one I’m talking about. Nevertheless, let’s get this started.

The series continued in 2007 with The Bourne Ultimatum.

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Picking up right where The Bourne Supremacy left off, Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is trying to covertly make his way out of Moscow. Six weeks after his escape, the CIA begins tailing journalist Simon Ross (Paddy Considine) after he publishes articles about Bourne and is overheard on his phone talking about Operation Blackbriar. This forces Bourne to also track him to find who his source of all this information is. Now  back in the crosshairs of the CIA, specifically Deputy Director Noah Vosen (David Straithairn) and the more sympathetic Pamela Landy (Joan Allen), Bourne fights his way across the globe trying to find answers about his past and Operation Treadstone, which ultimately leads him back to New York City where the truth will all finally be revealed.

Way up high on the Mount Olympus of film, The Bourne Ultimatum acts as one of the main representatives of action. It’s everything you want in an action movie, but then also delivers an intelligent story and rich characters. I will say that the annoying Paul Greengrass shaky cam is still there, but the action is so wild that I could easily look past it. There are stunts that happen in this movie that goes to show you don’t need CGI for everything. One scene in particular shows a car going up a divider and spinning off of it into another car which causes both of them to roll out of control. Watching the special features on how they did that was absolutely incredible and makes this movie even more impressive.

The Bourne Ultimatum is easily the best film in the entire series. It reveals a lot about Bourne’s past, introduces new villains while reinforcing heroes we’ve come to love. There’s plenty of action and espionage to keep the most jaded and critical film goer at bay while also telling a really dark and intelligent story that mirrors the real world in some scary ways. My only real complaint is how Greengrass uses the camera in action sequences, but it really wasn’t as annoying as it was in The Bourne Supremacy. The bottom line is that this is one of the best action films ever to be made and deserves all of the praise and accolades that it receives.

After that masterpiece, there was a lot to live up to. What came next, however, was kind of weird. That was the 2012 film The Bourne Legacy.

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Taking place during and after the events of The Bourne Ultimatum, The Bourne Legacy introduces Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner), a genetically enhanced super soldier who’s part of a CIA black op called Operation Outcome. The consequences of Bourne’s actions mixed with inner departmental problems forces Eric Byer (Edward Norton) to completely shut down Operation Outcome, and by that he means whipe out all of the agents working around the globe. They don’t count on Cross surviving the attack and how desperate he would be to get his hands on the pills that keep him genetically superior. He soon finds and enlists the help of Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), a biochemist who has analyzed and treated the agents of Operation Outcome. The two travel to the Philippines to inject Cross with a serum that will permanently keep him a step above the rest, but the CIA and local authorities seem to always be around every corner.

As I was watching The Bourne Legacy, I was really trying hard to get into it. Edward Norton and Rachel Weisz both give good performances, and Jeremy Renner makes Aaron Cross a very memorable and fully realized character. There were even a few scenes that were really cool, like a long take that has Cross scaling a house, going into a window, and shooting someone. That’s where it all ends. This movie does not feel like an addition to the Bourne series. There’s only a few scenes with characters from the trilogy and brief mentioning of things that Bourne is doing. Cross doesn’t even really qualify as a “legacy” because he’s part of Operation Outcome and not Treadstone. I don’t understand this movie in the least.

The Bourne Legacy is really missing out on a lot of key elements that make the other movies great. For one thing, the sense of completely grounded realism is gone for me with the introduction of these pills that make super soldiers. Another thing is that the action is less than stellar and even boring. Finally, there just isn’t enough of a connection to the other movies. It’s one thing that Jason Bourne isn’t even in this, but there was still a lot of room to make a spin off that really brings the movies together. Unfortunately we got this mess of a movie.

Well there you have it. The first three Bourne movies are spectacular action movies that helped redefine what the genre should be while also telling a story full of intriguing characters and memorable twists. Just don’t let The Bourne Legacy sour what those movies accomplished.

The Bourne Series – Review Part I

24 Jan

This is a review I’ve been wanting to do for a long time since these movies have a very special place in my film loving heart. The Bourne Identity was one of my most watched movies when I was growing up, and was actually one of the first “real” movies I ever sat down, watched, and appreciated. Instead of just reviewing that one, however, I want to take a look at the entire series. These are the kind of spy movies I really like because I feel like stuff like this could actually happen. I have a lot to say about this series so why not just get started?

The Bourne Identity kickstarted the series with its release in 2002.

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On a stormy night in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, a man (Matt Damon) is pulled out of the water by a group of fisherman. He has been shot three times, has a bank number lodged into his hip, and he can’t remember who he is and how he got there. Upon arriving in Zürich, the man discovers his name to be Jason Bourne, but he also finds that he being chased by all types of law enforcement. He enlists the help of a desperate woman, Marie (Franka Potente), who he offers to pay a grand sum of money in exchange for a ride. As they travel to Paris to find out more about Bourne’s identity, Treadstone, a CIA black operation led by Alexander Conklin (Chris Cooper),  sends out all of their sleeper agents to track down Bourne and take him out before he does anymore damage to the CIA.

The Bourne Identity is one of the movies I watched a lot when I was younger, so it’s one of the movies that really got me into movies as much as I am today. I’ve seen and heard a lot of people say that this film breathed new life into the stale action genre of the early 2000s, and I can definitely see that, since a lot of action/thriller films that came after this one drew a lot of creative inspiration. This film is a perfect combination of espionage and action, with a villainous section of the CIA going against a one man war machine that is Jason Bourne. This makes for many great action sequences, car chases, and games of cat and mouse that happen throughout Europe. It’s a spy movie of the highest degree.

This movie was really fun to re-watch after not having seen it for quite a few years. It really hasn’t lost it’s luster and still remains as thrilling as it’s always been. While people knew who Matt Damon was before this, this is the movie that put him to the status of being a Hollywood superstar. This is also the film that successfully kickstarted a whole franchise. If you can’t tell already, I love this movie.

In 2004, The Bourne Supremacy was released. While definitely superior in some regards to the first film, there are some major drawbacks that sour the movie more than they should have.

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For two year, Jason Bourne and Marie have been laying low and keeping their distance from Treadstone and the CIA. All they have built soon shatters when Bourne is framed for the murder of CIA agents who were intercepting documents with proof of who stole $20 million of CIA money. This forces Bourne to come out of hiding, clear his name, and get his revenge on whoever tainted his name and ruined the quiet life he made for himself. This time around, Bourne is forced to go up against the CIA Deputy Directors Pamela Landy (Joan Allen) and Ward Abbot (Brian Cox), while also facing off against Russian Secret Service agent Kirill (Karl Urban) in a war that spreads over multiple countries and cities around the world.

The Bourne Supremacy is a much different specimen that The Bourne Identity. It’s almost as if two different people made these movies. Wait, that’s because they did. Doug Liman was responsible for the very cinematic first film, while Paul Greengrass took the series into a whole other direction with his almost faux documentary style film making. Greengrass would later go on to use this style in films like United 93 and Captain Philips, and they work really well in those movies. Unfortunately, it isn’t always the best choice for this film. The scenes of dialogue are great because it really brings a sense of realism to the story, especially with the handheld look. The fights suffer completely, however, and that’s a shame since the fights are such a big part in these movies. The action often becomes so incomprehensible, I had to just stop looking at it. Major points are deducted from The Bourne Supremacy because of that.

What The Bourne Supremacy does really well is tell a more intriguing story than its predecessor. The first film sort of just introduced the character and his situation, but this film goes deep into the rabbit hole that is Treadstone and shows just how corrupt it is. What’s fun about this is because it’s all very easy to believe something like this happening, and that makes all of the thrills completely worth it. It injects the series with something that can be a real life event. That being said, while I’m not a huge fan of how this movie is made, I can’e deny that it tells a great story, and that’s the most important thing to me.

The Bourne Identity and The Bourne Supremacy are a step above average spy thrillers and are part of the reason why I love movies as much as I do. I still have a few more movies to write about, so keep an eye out for the next part where I talk about The Bourne Ultimatum and The Bourne Legacy.

Sicario – Review

23 Oct

I’ve seen plenty of new movies this year, each with various degrees of emotion, suspense, and tension. Looking back on everything I’ve seen, I can honestly say that Sicario is the most intense film I have seen and probably will see all year. Directed by Denis Villeneuve (Prisoners and Enemy), written by Taylor Sheridan (known for a performance on Sons of Anarchy), and filmed by Roger Deakins (who worked with Velleneuve and on many of the Coen Brothers’ films), Sicario not only looks beautiful and offers a very powerful and realistic story, it also features strong performances from all its actors. Sicario is definitely a stand out film of 2015.

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Kate Macer (Emily Blunt) is a young FBI agent with a bright future ahead of her. After a terrifying encounter with murderous members of the cartel, Macer is recruited by mysterious government agent Matt Graver (Josh Brolin) to be part of a strike force aimed at crippling those responsible. She soon meets Graver’s partner Alejandro (Benicio del Toro), who she can’t quite place on any particular side or agency, making him the wild card of the team. After joining this special operations team, Macer is plunged into the violent world of the Mexican drug trade where the reprehensible violence is done by the cartel as well as the Americans she is working for, and soon clear right and wrong becomes indistinguishable.

Sicario very much reminds me of Steven Soderbergh’s Traffic from 2000. Both films show the realities of the drug trade and the lives that are affected by all of the violence. While Traffic is most certainly unapologetic, Sicario feels like a behind the scenes look at something we’re not supposed to see. There’s crime, lies, torture, and murder on both sides of the spectrum, which forces the audience to find logic in the lesser of two evils. This isn’t really a film that will allow you to kick back and relax for a few hours. There is way too much thought that has to be put into the story and characters, plus it’s just way too stressful.

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There’s a scene in Sicario where the special forces team is attempting to cross the Bridge of the Americas to get back into the United States. The only problem is that they are caught in a gridlock and are surrounded by a few cars filled with cartel members. Instead of creating what could’ve been a run of the mill action sequence, Villeneuve and Sheridan create an incredibly suspenseful and low key scene that explodes in only a few seconds of realistic violence. This scene is the best example of the tension that this movie creates. Never does anything in this movie seem overblown or unnecessary. This also means that there is a lot of down time between missions that the team goes on, which may seem boring, but remember that this film is striving for realism.

Even though Sicario strives to paint an accurate portrait reality, never does it forget that it is still a movie and requires time for cinematic drama and character development. Sheridan’s screenplay is very down to earth and all of the actors play their parts very well. Emily Blunt and Benicio del Toro especially stand out as the scene stealers of this movie. Deakins’ cinematography is as beautiful as ever and deserves a possible Oscar nom when all is said and done. Speaking of Oscar noms, Jóhann Jóhannsson’s score is haunting and is certainly the best music I’ve heard in a movie all year.

Sicario is an unforgettable movie experience that feels like it sometimes bends the rulers of modern film making in order to create a unique story with real characters and situations. There have been a lot of great movies that came out this year, and this film stands up there in the upper echelons of my favorites of 2015. It can be difficult and unsettling at points, but it feels so authentic that it should be required viewing for anyone who loves movies.

The A-Team – Review

24 Sep

In 1983, Frank Lupo and Stephen Cannell created a show called The A-Team, which was about a crack commando unit who are sent to and escape from prison for a crime they didn’t commit. They then survive as soldiers of fortune working out of L.A., mostly specializing in helping people who can’t defend themselves against a bigger enemy. While this show it definitely silly, it’s still a lot of fun because of the chemistry between the team, the writing of their characters, and the fact that there’s plenty of action in every episode. But that’s not what we’re talking about. We’re talking about Joe Carnahan’s 2010 adaptation, a film that almost lives up to its source material, but unfortunately falls flat.

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While on a covert mission in Mexico, John “Hannibal” Smith (Liam Neeson) and Templeton “Faceman” Peck (Bradley Cooper) meet two other Army Rangers, B.A. Baracus (Quinton Jackson) and “Howling Mad” Murdock (Sharlto Copley). Over the course of eight years, they become one of the most essential military units in Iraq, but are unfortunately are tricked into a mission by CIA Agent Lynch (Patrick Wilson) to reacquire U.S. Treasury plates taken by Iraqi insurgents. The mission is a success, but this unsanctioned mission and the mysterious murder of their commanding officer lands the team in prison. It doesn’t take long for them to break out, reunite, and begin their new mission to clear their names and take down Lynch and whoever else may be responsible while evading capture by Captain Charissa Sosa (Jessica Biel).

Now I understand that just because someone is making an adaptation of a novel, or a television show, or an older film doesn’t mean that it has to be an absolutely perfect recreation of its source material. The A-Team, for that matter, does stay pretty close but the compromises that are made were kind of weird and things just didn’t fit together properly. I’ll get to that later. There are parts of this movie that I definitely did like. The action, for one thing, is awesome and perfectly captures the over the top mayhem that you would see in the television show. Murdock flying a helicopter upside down, B.A. running from containers falling off an exploding ship, and the team trying to “fly” a tank are just a few memorable action scenes. This isn’t too surprising since Joe Carnahan was behind one of my favorite action movie, the chaotic Smokin’ Aces.

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It’s a pretty heavy responsibility when actors have to step into the shoes of such beloved characters. The whole point of the original t.v. show wasn’t necessarily the action, but how the four soldiers got along together and functioned perfectly as a team. The characters were each very rich and unique, and that being said, the actors in this movie sort of get it right. Bradley Cooper as Face and Sharlto Copley as Murdock are the best choices for those characters and they nail it. It was the closest you could get to the real thing. Quinton Jackson does fine as B.A., but never really reaches the same humorous intensity as Mr. T. Finally, Liam Neeson is poor as Hannibal. He’s far too stoic of an actor and pretty much takes all of the joy out of the character. Jessica Biel and Patrick Wilson seem completely out of place and also give in some stale performances. In fact, some of the lines written for them combined with their delivery is worthy of a good, hard cringe.

While most people (myself included) watch action movies for the action and can forgive a bland plot, it still helps if the plot makes sense. The story of The A-Team made sense, but you really had to think about it and try to put it all together. Everyone’s getting backstabbed, and then backstabbed again and all these ulterior motives make the plot hard to follow. This is The A-Team we’re talking about here. Why does this have to be such a confusing mess of a story? The formulaic good guys vs bad guys routine of the source material made it easy to focus on the characters, but now I spent most of the movie just trying to figure out what the hell was going on. Not only that, but the villains were just poorly written cartoon characters that are hated simply because they’re written so badly.

The A-Team isn’t an awful excuse for an action movie, nor is it a total letdown to fans of the television show, like myself. As I was watching the movie, though, I wish they’d just remove the A-Team, call it something else, and call it a day. The action is fantastic, and makes the movie worth a watch at least once. What sucks is that there really isn’t any good chemistry between the actors, which makes their tight knit relationships fall short. The story is also way too confusing for its own good and the side characters are stupid. While it’s cool that they tried to go for a modern approach to the characters, it doesn’t quite make, which, ultimately, makes The A-Team a failure.

Colombiana – Review

3 Jan

I don’t really like judging action movies too hard. There are some that are actually excellent pieces of film making, but then there are others that can only be seen as popcorn entertainment. Colombiana belongs in the latter category. Although it tries to be something more than it actually is, I feel like everything in the movie is recycled and the pieces don’t always fit to form a perfectly clear bigger picture.

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As a young girl, Cataleya (Zoe Saldana), sees her mother and father gunned down by men sent by Don Luis (Beto Benites), a powerful cartel boss. Sworn to avenge her parents, she is trained by her uncle Emilio (Cliff Curtis) to become a powerful assassin. Now that Cataleya is older and more experienced, she finally targets Don Luis and tries pushing him out of his hiding spot so that she can attack. This may prove to be a more difficult task since Don Luis has a connection that he is willing to use in the CIA.

The best way I can describe Colombiana is that it’s a combination of Léon: The Professional and La Femme Nikita, both of which are Luc Besson films. Well, what do you know? Colombiana was written by Luc Besson. I have great respect for the guy. He has created many fantastic action films that are both fun and memorable, but this is a pretty lazy attempt when it comes to creativity. I haven’t just seen all of this before, I’ve seen it in movies of the same writer and they are completely recycled ideas.

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Everything about this movie is pretty ho hum including the performances.  Zoe Saldana is beautiful, but nothing really special, even though she definitely has the ability to be a believable leaden lady. Part of it has to do with the dialogue she was given to work with. Cliff Curtis has some dramatic scenes that are easy to get into and Jordi Mollá is more interesting than the main villain. None of these performances are what I would call bad, but the writing by Besson is surprisingly dry and cliché.

A point I will give the movie is that the action can be really cool. There’s one fight that happens in a bathroom that abandons all filmic style and tries to play as real as possible. The choreography isn’t overly stylized, like a lot of the gun play in the movie, but actually looks like a fight of this kind would look like. The stylized violence can be pretty fun, with a surprising scene involving a rocket launcher being a high light for me. I feel that maybe Besson and directer Olivier Megaton both really just wanted to make a really cool looking action movie and didn’t really think worrying about the script would be too much of a concern.

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I can’t recommend Colombiana. It has its moments of fun, but the rest of the movie is a stereotypical mess. I didn’t care about the villain or Cataleya’s main mission. All I really wanted was to see the next cool action sequence. Quiet moments of dialogue that were used to create drama turned out to not be dramatic at all and even stale some of the performances. Zoe Saldana is beautiful and some of the action scenes are really cool, but there are much better action movies out there to watch than Colombiana.

The Good Shepherd – Review

13 Dec

There’s been a lot of movies about the CIA and spies, but I don’t think I’ve ever watched one quite like The Good Shepherd. It’s more than just a cloak and dagger spy film. It’s also a story about relationships that should not exist, paranoia, and missed opportunities. It’s also almost three hours long. To some, this length will be a positive, to others it will be a major hindrance.

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In the early days of the CIA, Edward Wilson (Matt Damon) devotes his life to the agency and constantly surrounds himself with a collage of friends and enemies. The twist is that he doesn’t know who are his friends and who are his enemies. While he covertly fights for America, his home life becomes a nuisance, constantly interfering with his work. With the Bay of Pigs Invasion proving to be a failure, Wilson begins to question his position in life and whether or not he chose the right path.

Throughout the entirety of The Good Shepherd, the viewer sits through all sorts of historical events. There’s the Blitz of World War II and growing conflict with Russia, all the way up to the Bay of Pigs. Needless to say, a lot happens. In a way, this could make the plot unbelievably confusing, as is the case with a lot of films like this. What makes the story easy to get a grasp on is the fact that all of the espionage isn’t really the focal point of the story. Sure, it’s an important part but what is the crucial plot point is the stability of the characters. This could be through relationship, physical, or mental.

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There are so many great performers giving excellent performances. Matt Damon is the star of the show, and makes it really easy for the viewer to both dislike but also sympathize with his character. Angelina Jolie gives a strong performance, and speaking of strong performances, John Turturro gives an outstanding performance even though he doesn’t get a whole lot of screen time. Other stars include Alec Baldwin, John Hurt, Robert De Niro (who also directs), and Billy Crudup. The aforementioned actors have the least amount of screen time, although they make the most of the their roles.

Now, as I said before, this is a very long movie clocking in at two hours and forty five minutes. Personally, I love long movies because I feel like it’s a grand story with a lot to say. That being said, this definitely could have been trimmed down, at least a little bit. Or, even better, it could have made a great miniseries. That’s really what this movie felt like: and HBO miniseries. There’s so much that happens throughout the years of this movie that go by so quickly because of time. It also has moments where the plot slows down and it gets really boring, which just reaffirms the fact that The Good Shepherd would have been a better miniseries.

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I’d like to briefly touch on how amazing the movie looks. The costumes and the sets all look fantastic and very believable. Selling a movie like this would be very difficult unless everything is spot on. Styles and technology changes, and we all get to see that happen as the movie progresses. It’s very interesting and done very well.

I read a review that said said something along the lines of: “It is easier to respect that like The Good Shepherd.” I can see how some critics and viewers could see that, and I couldn’t really argue with that. My opinion is that this is one of the best spy films I have ever seen. It’s not particularly violent and there isn’t too much suspense, but I will say that it is very real, and that’s why I liked it so much. Sure, it can be dry and it is very long, but it’s expertly crafted and surprisingly easy to follow. If you have a free afternoon, you may want to check out The Good Shepherd.