Tag Archives: Danny DeVito

L.A. Confidential – Review

15 Jan

Many people will argue that the golden age of Hollywood was between the late 1930s all the way up to the end of the 1950s. Genres were created and perfected in ways that have not been seen since then. Few films have tried and truly succeeded in recreating this image of these perfect years, but one film equally praises and criticizes. That film is L.A. Confidential, a detective story where good guys are just as corrupt as bad guys and everything is kept off the record, on the q.t., and very hush hush.

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1953. Los Angeles. To outsiders, it seems like a paradise just waiting to be explored. To its residents, it is a den of lust, corruption, and violence. After a bloody massacre at the Nite Owl café, three police officers’ lives and problems become tangled as each tries to solve the case for their own particular gains. They are: by the book Edmund Exley (Guy Pearce), celebrity hound Jack Vincennes (Kevin Spacey), and the violent Bud White (Russell Crowe). Alliances are formed and torn apart as betrayal and greed worm their ways through the characters and, especially, when a few characters fall for a beautiful call girl, Lynn (Kim Basinger), who just might be the biggest connection to the case that these detectives have.

L.A. Confidential is more about the characters and the themes than it is about solving the actual mystery. I don’t want to say that the actual crime is pushed to the back burner, because it is visited time and again, especially towards the end, but this isn’t what the viewer is really paying attention to. First and foremost they are learning the characters and their motives, and then learning how their motives affect one another. Then the themes come to mind: corruption, greed, and a strange sense of dark nostalgia. These themes blend with the characters and shape their personalities to make a complex and adult character driven story.

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In order for these characters to be so memorable, the performances had to match their complexities. Thankfully, there is a very talented cast to support this movie. Kevin Spacey stands out as Vincennes. He’s a likable Hollywood dirt ball who just so happens to be a policeman and he plays the part very well with quick one liners that can quickly change to brooding seriousness.  Guy Pearce plays Exley, one of the most complicated characters of the film, perfectly straightforward. Russell Crowe is the weakest of the three, sometimes falling into to the pitfall of cliché, which isn’t necessarily his fault. Finally, Kim Basinger, who won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, is just fine but nothing really special. It doesn’t really have “Academy Award” written on the performance.

These characters would be nothing without the intelligent, borderline genius, screenplay. While the story itself kind of takes a place off to the side it still can’t be denied that it’s fantastic. It is pulp crime at its finest with a deep mystery filled with lies and violence. The dialogue is very personal and every line feels necessary. The other Academy Award that was honored to this movie was for Best Adapted Screenplay, which I feel is very well deserved.

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L.A. Confidential is a fantastic ride into the depths of crime of 1950s Los Angeles. The writing, complex story, and characters are all fantastic and supported by the magnificent performances. I loved this movie from beginning to end, not once getting bored throughout the entire two hours and fifteen minutes it was on. IF you live crime fiction and noir films then this is the film to boost your spirits.

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Mars Attacks! – Review

20 Apr

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a huge Tim Burton fan. Most of his movies, besides maybe his version of Planet of the Apes, have an awesome style that combines the macabre with dark humor, which really strikes a cord with me. Mars Attacks! isn’t quite as dark as his other films, but the dark humor is absolutely overpowering, which both helps and hinders Burton’s personal ode to a series of vintage trading cards and the style of classic 1950s sic-fi B-movies.

When it is brought to the attention of President Jimmy Dale (Jack Nicholson) that Martian ships have surrounded Earth, he leaps at the chance to make contact with these beings and begin to work together. During the first meeting that is held with the aliens, a huge firefight breaks out between the Martians and the military. Soon, the world is engulfed in an all out war with the Martians, who with their sick senses of humor and love of violence attempt to take over our planet.

Mars Attacks! is loaded with celebrities. Jack Nicholson plays both the president and Art Land, a money hungry casino manager. Glenn Close plays the first lady and Martin Short is the horny Press Secretary Jerry Ross. Anette Bening plays Land’s peace loving alcoholic wife. Michael J. Fox and Sarah Jessica Parker are sleazy news reporters, the latter having a strong attraction to Pierce Brosnan, who plays Professor Donald Kessler. Danny DeVito has a small part as a greedy gambler and Tom Jones is hysterical as himself.

These characters all made me laugh in their own way, but the really stars are the Martians themselves, who have really funny dialogue, even though all they say is “ack.” Even though we don’t speak their language, we as an audience know exactly what they are saying. These Martians try to conquer Earth in the most obnoxious way possible. They don’t only kill anything they see, but it is clearly evident they want to have as much fun as they can with the destruction of a planet.

Something I found really shocking about this movie was how violent it was, but don’t mistake me, I’m not condemning the violence in it. I’m merely saying it was a bit unexpected. Once the Martians arrive on Earth, the sic-fi shoot outs and destruction are pretty much non-stop. When a human gets hit with one of the lasers from the Martian’s, all the flesh disintegrates, leaving only a bright green or red skeleton. The effect is really cool and it was fun to watch. It was also fun seeing the Martian’s heads explode inside their helmets. Roger Ebert says that this particular gag was only funny the first couple of times, but I never got tired of it.

The only detraction I can really give this movie is that the storyline is INCREDIBLY weak. There really almost is no storyline besides “Martians attacks Earth and funny stuff happens.” None of the characters really go through any sort of change or discovery, and a couple characters in particular aren’t implemented enough. The characters themselves are pretty funny, but the real humor lies with the twisted Martians and how the human characters react.

While Mars Attacks! is far from being Tim Burton’s best movie, it’s still a really fun escape into a silly world where all of the important people of the world are ridiculous caricatures here for our amusement. The writing is average and the plot is pretty stupid, but I laughed at almost every scene. It may be silly, over the top, and juvenile at times, but it’s a fun ode to movies of the past.