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Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – Review

27 Mar

Well, here we are. I’ve been waiting a very long time for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice to be released, as I’m sure many other people have been as well. Before this film we got Man of Steel which I thought was a pretty cool movie despite the pacing to be way off, which made the whole movie feel overly long and slightly disjointed. Going into this movie, I had these problems in mind while I was gauging my expectations. It is a Zack Snyder movie, after all. You really have to approach his films with caution. Now that I’ve seen Batman v Superman I can say that all of my worries and suspicions about the pacing have come true, but in much worse ways than I ever imagined. That being said, there are still some rewarding elements to this movie that made it worth seeing.

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While Superman (Henry Cavill) can easily be called a hero in many regards, it may be hard to say that while watching him destroy a city in order to defeat fellow Kryptonian General Zod (Michael Shannon). This is the conflict suffered by Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck), a billionaire playboy who just so happens to be the masked vigilante of Gotham City, Batman. Bruce is very uncomfortable with seeing the power Superman can wield go on without any repercussions, so he makes it his mission to find a way to put that power in check and ultimately get rid of the Man of Steel. Meanwhile, criminal mastermind Lex Luthor (Jessie Eisenberg) begins working on a way to use kryptonite as a deterrent against Superman and other super powerful beings in case the need should arise that the human rase needs protection from the so called protectors. What happens next is a clash of super heroic titans that will pave the way for heroes and villains of the future (at least in terms of the DC cinematic universe).

Where do I even begin? Throughout Snyder’s filmography, it has become quite clear that the pacing of his movies slows them down so much, it literally feels like the plot is stuck in the mud. I knew this was going to be the case in Batman v Superman, so I went into the movie ready for that. Little did I know that it was going to be this horrendously overstuffed, paced out, and edited. Like, honestly, how did this movie get a pass? It has such a sloppy structure that at times makes the story incoherent, which is a huge problem considering that this movie is the start of a much bigger DC universe. Not to mention that there are so many scenes and story arcs that only seemed to be in there so the movie can be over two and a half hours long. There’s one story arc about Lois Lane investigating a prototype bullet being sold to radicals that was SO INSANELY STUPID I couldn’t even handle it.

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While this movie is absolutely infuriating at times, when Batman v Superman gets good, it gets great. The entire political game that Luthor and Senator Finch are involved in along with Superman facing up to the damage he’s caused is very interesting. Bruce Wayne also has some really dark scenes where you can almost see his past excursions as the Dark Knight and how they’ve so negatively affected him. These are the scenes that really stand out, but the action sequences in this movie are also very memorable and exciting. Wether it’s Batman careening through the streets of Gotham in his Batmobile, the duel between Batman and Superman, or the overwhelmingly destructive showdown with Doomsday, this movie has some seriously great looking action that almost makes all the scenes that shouldn’t have existed worth it.

When it was first released that Ben Affleck was cast as Batman/Bruce Wayne, many people seemed to be outraged. I, personally, was more curious to see how he’d play it. Turns out, he gives one of the best performances of the character, and certainly is the darkest Bruce Wayne has ever been on the silver screen. Henry Cavill continues to be fine as Superman/Clark Kent, and pretty much gives the same performance he did in Man of Steel. Jeremy Irons, unsurprisingly, is great as Alfred, who appears just as world weary as his troubled bat companion. Gal Gadot, while not in the movie all that much, was totally badass as Wonder Woman, and I can’t wait to see more of her in future installments. Now we come to Jessie Eisenberg as Lex Luthor, a casting choice that shows that a bunch of lunatics were working on this movie. Oddly enough, I didn’t hate Eisenberg as much as I thought I was going to. He played an obsessive compulsive psychopath very well, but really it wasn’t Lex Luthor I was watching. I more so hate what they did to the character, while Eisenberg seemed to play it as best he could.

Calling Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice a disappointment is a completely valid and accurate statement. That being said, it isn’t an awful movie. I can’t really say it’s all that good of a movie, either. All I can say is that it’s ok, and I really wish it was more than that. The worst part of it is that I can see a great movie somewhere, but it’s covered by so much garbage and stupid plot arcs and unnecessary scenes. It’s devastating to see a movie with so many great scenes get dragged into mediocrity because of poor directorial choices and a screenplay that doesn’t make much sense. DC certainly has some work to do.

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The Man From U.N.C.L.E. – Review

31 Aug

Hollywood seems to be in a very nostalgic mood these past few years, what with all the remakes and reboots of movies and shows that newer generations may have never seen or heard of. It’s a nice idea, but it’s kind of being overloaded. Probably the strangest choice I’ve seen recently is Guy Ritchie’s newest film The Man From U.N.C.L.E. I say this because it was a show that was deeply rooted in the Cold War paranoia of the 1960s, even though it was a very light hearted, tongue in cheek kind of show. Of course, I trusted Ritchie’s skill with making this movie, and while it is far from being his best, it’s still an entertaining ride that breathes some colorful life during the end of the summer blockbuster season.

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The movie wastes no time getting started with American spy Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) on a mission in East Berlin to extract a woman named Gaby Teller (Alicia Vikander) and bring her over the Berlin Wall. During the mission, and unbeknownst to him, a KGB agent, Ilya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) is hot in his heels to stop him. What the two soon realize, is that they are being set up by their respective governments and soon Solo and Kuryakin are teamed up to stop an even bigger threat to both the Soviets and the Americans. This threat is a nuclear bomb being manufactured for a family of Nazi sympathizers, and the physicist building the bomb is Gaby’s estranged father. Now it’s up to Solo, Kuryakin, and Teller to gather all the information on this family as they can and stop them before they do serious damage to the world, and possibly start a war.

In 1963 when the television show was aired, it was pretty crazy to have an American and Soviet spy working together. It’s actually a really cool idea and made the stories seem more global. That being said, the show is incredibly dated, and while it is a lot of fun, it can be just as silly. What is really cool about this new adaptation of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. is that Guy Ritchie doesn’t try to make this a dark story with life ending drama and suspense that is almost too sharp. Negative. This film actually feels like a 2 hour long episode, but with different people of course. That may be a problem for some people who want to have something deeper to watch, but that’s just not going to be found here. This is light hearted summer fun.

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With Snatch and the Sherlock Holmes movies and the rest of Ritchie’s filmography, there’s one thing that is always present in every single one of his movies. Style. Lots and lots and lots of style. Then some more style, probably enough for three movies. Really, who best to mush together the vibes of the swingin’ sixties and the paranoia and fear of the Cold War? The colors in this movie really pop, but never does it feel like an exaggeration. There are certain scenes, however, where the style is exaggerated. The camera flies all over the place, the pictures spin and blend together, there’s split screen shots, and all of this combined with the music that any Guy Ritchie fan knows all too well.

Now, while this is a spy movie, it’s also a comedy. Cavill’s and Hammer’s chemistry is great, and it’s fun to see the two start their mission hating each other and grow closer to the spies that were scene in the original television show. The actors also have their characters down perfectly. Solo is pompous and snide, but also certainly likable while Kuryakin is a tough as nails Russian who’s weaknesses are revealed throughout the course of the movie. Seeing both of these people in scenes where they’re out of their element provides some of the most enjoyable parts of the film, even though some of the more straightforward jokes fall flat.

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. feels like a much smaller blockbuster than most of the other movies to come out this summer, but it still provides a few hours of serious fun and a lot of laughs. Compared to SnatchSherlock Holmes, and even Rock ‘n’ Rolla, this film feels like one of the weaker movies made by Guy Ritchie, but that’s not to say that it isn’t quite good. It’s not necessarily action packed or thrilling, but it’s a fun ride into the vintage world of Cold War espionage, and one that doesn’t take itself to seriously.

Man of Steel – Review

30 Jun

Superman has never been my favorite super hero. In fact, he’s pretty far from it. I always found that his near indestructibility and countless super powers made things a bit too easy, and I was never too fond of Clark Kent as a character either. That being said, when the trailers for Zach Snyder’s Man of Steel began coming out, I began thinking that this incarnation of DC Comic’s most prized creation may not be too shabby. I can’t say that I was at all disappointed, but Man of Steel is certainly not a perfect movie.

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The distant planet of Krypton is close to destruction due to the large amount of exploiting the natural resources of the planet which has affected the planet’s core. Jor-El (Russell Crowe) stores a genetic codex in the cells of his newborn son Kal-El and sends him to planet Earth after General Zod (Michael Shannon) stages a coup with the hope of saving the planet. Zod is banished to the Phantom Zone, but is freed after Krypton is destroyed. On Earth, Kal-El is found by farmers Jonathan (Kevin Costner) and Martha Kent (Diane Lane), who rename him Clark and raise him as their own son. After years of learning to control his super abilities caused by his biological reaction to being on Earth, an adult Clark (Henry Cavill) learns of his extraterrestrial past and vows to protect the Earth. This responsibility comes sooner rather than later when Zod arrives to retrieve the codex hidden within Clark and form a new Krypton so his race can survive.

There is a lot that happens within the two hour and twenty minute running time of the movie. Much like with Snyder’s previous film, 300, the pacing of this movie is what really hurts it. In this reviewer’s opinion, we spend way too much time on Krypton. By the time we got to Earth, I felt relieved since I felt like the “prologue” was finally over. As Clark grows up and learns of his powers and his past, most of the story is told in flashbacks, which is very jarring when mixed with the adult Clark trying to find his way. This really is the only effective way that this could have been pulled off, but there is just so much crammed in there. That being said, this is an origin story, and origin stories aren’t always the easiest to make because it’s the responsibility of the writer and director to establish this character’s past enough so that we understand them and beliefs.

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This being a Zack Snyder movie, there is sure to be an excess of special effects that go right along with over the top action. In this category, Man of Steel delivers. Once the action starts, it never seems to let up. It almost becomes exhausting. If you think New York City had it bad in the finale of The Avengers, just wait until you see the destruction that befalls Metropolis. Buildings, trains, jets, helicopters, you name it. I will say that there was a lot of characters getting thrown into buildings. That sounds ridiculous, but it’s true. It happens so many times that I almost wanted to say, “That’s cool Zack, but I get the picture.”

Henry Cavill was definitely the right choice to play Superman, but I still can’t really say his character is all that interesting. I may be biased in saying that because I always thought he was kind of a bland character. Amy Adams is acceptable as Lois Lane, bringing an appropriate amount of curiosity and interest. The real scene stealers are Michael Shannon and Russell Crowe. These two seem so into their characters and the universe that they inhabit that it really is just a joy to watch them, especially when Michael Shannon would lose his temper and yell a lot. That was fun.

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I have never really been a fan of Superman. The whole concept behind the hero always seemed kind of cheesy. After seeing Man of Steel, I’m beginning to realize that part of the reason has been the presentation. This most recent incarnation of Superman offers outstanding action, the deepest the characters have ever been, and a good origin story. The pacing is kind disjointed and the movie is overly long, but saying that I didn’t have a really good time at Man of Steel would be a downright lie.