Tag Archives: joel edgerton

Midnight Special – Review

1 Jul

Science fiction is probably my favorite genre of film and literature because it can form such a huge spectrum of stories to be told. Recently, there’s been a huge influx of space films like the resurgences of Star Trek and Star Wars, but also completely original ideas like Christopher Nolan’s excellent work with Interstellar. If not space, the market seems flooded with science fiction via superhero films. What I don’t see a lot of are smaller films that still have a grand story to tell without all the bells and whistles of major Hollywood productions. This is partially why I was so interested with Jeff Nichols’ film Midnight Special, along with the fact that it stars my favorite actor, Michael Shannon. With my expectations raised pretty high, I’m thrilled to say that Midnight Special did not disappoint.

On a seemingly quiet night, and AMBER alert is issued for an 8 year old boy named Alton Meyer (Jaeden Lieberher). It’s revealed that he’s safe and sound in a motel with his father Roy (Michael Shannon) and Roy’s close friend Lucas (Joel Edgerton). As the trio hit the road during the darkest hours of the night, the FBI raid a religious cult’s farmland to interrogate its founder, Pastor Calvin (Sam Shepard), who raised Alton since Roy and his wife, Sarah (Kirsten Dunst), left the compound. The main interrogator is NSA communication analyst Paul Sevier (Adam Driver) who is more interested with how Calvin was able to get highly classified satellite communications through Alton. It’s soon revealed through Roy’s travels with Alton with the FBI and members of the cult hot on their tails that Alton may not be of this world, and while his origins are unknown to all parties involved, it’s evident that he’s about to reveal something that will change the world forever.

Let me just say, the way this story is told is fantastic. The structure that this narrative falls into is really the only way this story can be told. The film begins in medias res with Roy, Lucas, and Alton on the run and we as the audience don’t know why. This first part of the movie is so riveting because I really hadn’t the slightest idea of what everything meant. Was Alton an alien or some sort of experiment gone wrong? What was the deal with the religious cult? How powerful is Alton and what are his weaknesses. Nichols knows that with a story like this, there’s going to be some major questions and he uses that to the film’s advantage and creates this mysterious thread that totally morphs into a web. The atmosphere of science fiction blends well with the rural roads our travelers call home during the night, and the mystery of what is actually going on had me hooked from beginning to end.

My last review was of J.C. Chandor’s Margin Call, and I really liked that movie except for a problem with certain characters and their relevancy to the story. As much as I really liked Midnight Special, I feel like this film is a bigger offender of the same problem. Early in the movie we get introduced to the religious cult Alton comes from and its charismatic leader, Pastor Calvin. I really liked this element of the story in the way that it seemed to be blending science fiction and religion. It’s a theme that’s seen pretty frequently in the genre, but it felt really down to earth in this film. Unfortunately, this cult doesn’t really amount to much and the only impact they have on the story lasts a few scenes, one of them being quite intense. Still, I would have liked to see a lot more from the cult and especially from Sam Shepard’s character, Calvin, because he was really selling that role well.

Like I said, Midnight Special is science fiction brought down to earth. It’s something I felt like could be happening at this very moment, and I even thought about if I’ve ever driven past someone on a dark highway going through some extraordinary even like this, and I would never know. With these huge science fiction films taking us to different worlds and galaxies, it was refreshing to see a movie that just spans a couple of states with a story that deals with real people. While this movie isn’t action packed, it still has plenty of really unique special effects that I will forever associate with this film and some larger than life ideas that I feel pay off very well.

Midnight Special is truly just a wonderful story and I have to give Jeff Nichols credit for once again leading me down a road where I couldn’t have guessed the destination. This film works as science fiction, family drama, and as a mystery that’s wrapped in a very well shot and paced film. The only gripes I have come from some characters that feel underused or just completely forgotten. Still, this is some excellent science fiction that deserves more praise than it gets.

Final Grade: A

The Rover – Review

28 Dec

Back in 2014, a movie called The Rover was released and I was determined to see it. The trailers for this movie were all incredible and promised a really tense and artistic ride through a post-apocalyptic world. As with a lot of movies I am determined to see, I never actually went to the theaters to see it and disappointed myself greatly. It wasn’t until just recently that I finally saw it, and after two years of build up I can tell you that I had really high expectations for this movie. What I got was pretty much everything I thought it would be and everything the trailers promised, but there were a few surprises along the way. The Rover is a very subtle and nonconventional film about a future that hopefully will never exist, but doesn’t seem all that far away.

timthumb

It’s been a decade since the collapse of Western civilization and people are doing whatever it takes to stay alive. One of these people is a mysterious loner named Eric, whose only possession he has left is his car. One day three thieves, led by Henry (Scoot McNairy), crash their truck and steal Eric’s car when he is in a bar. Eric watches them drive away and his initial search turns out to be completely hopeless. He soon runs into Rey (Robert Pattinson), Henry’s brother who was left for dead by the other thieves. Rey lets on that he knows where Henry and his cohorts are heading, which forces Eric to keep Rey around in order to find them and his car. As the search continues, Eric and Rey encounter many different people that inhabit the wasteland with their own secrets and dangers.

There are two things that become very clear to me after watching the first five minutes of The Rover. From the very first shot, I had a grasp on what the rhythm and the pacing of this movie was going to be, and it filled me with that all too familiar film geek glee. Writer/director David Michôd is someone who understands pacing, suspense, and maybe more importantly stillness. The film opens right away with Guy Pierce’s character sitting in his car for close to half a minute without moving. After that, there’s very little dialogue for the first 20 minutes of the movie. At least, there’s way less than what is expected in a movie. The rest of the movie moves at that pace and it’s exactly how a movie with a story and setting like this should go. Another thing that becomes clear is how pristine and beautiful the cinematography is. Michôd and director of photography Natasha Brair work so well together to create a look that is equal amounts gorgeous and dreadful. There are so many unique scenes in this film, especially one involving a car crash in the beginning of the film, that becomes seared into your brain.

the-rover03

So while The Rover is noticeably a beautifully shot movie there’s still something about it that remains very un-cinematic, and I mean that in a very positive way. I wouldn’t call this an action movie and there isn’t all that much violence in it, but when there is it’s startling and sometimes unexpected. People die in ways that aren’t cinematic or grand in any way. This film shows exactly what life would look like in a post apocalyptic Australian wasteland. There’s tragedy and humor, but by the end of the movie you see that all of that can be inconsequential depending on who the subject is. The cynicism of this movie is so strong I could almost feel it radiating from the screen. What else could be expected from this kind of future, though? The Rover isn’t a movie to make you feel good or have an uplifting time at the movies. It exists to show the lengths a person will go to protect themselves and their humanity in a time where these ideas are becoming extinct.

The characters of Eric and Rey are the only two characters that get any sort of attention or development, which means the whole movie and dramatic tension is riding on their shoulders and how well they play these parts. Guy Pierce has proven himself to be a very unique actor that is easily recognizable. It was no surprise that he took the weight of this post-apocalyptic world and turned it into a character that’s been so beaten down he will do anything to protect himself from any more suffering. This means he’ll kill or hurt anyone who is in his way, and Pierce helps make this character into an anti-hero of the everyman trying to live in the world of this movie. The real surprise was Robert Pattinson, who I’ve always tried to defend as an actor but never got any real proof of what I was defending. Cosmopolis was a giant disappointment, but The Rover shows that he can really do great work.

The Rover is a one of a kind movie that has stuck with me since the days that I watched it. The pacing and cinematography worked wonders at putting me in the world the movie took place in and the performances kept me focused on what would happen next. This is a great example of a post apocalyptic nightmare that also succeeds at being a unique and artistic vision. It is unconventional compared to a lot of other films in this genre, but that’s what makes The Rover such a memorable movie.

Final Grade: B+

Black Mass – Review

22 Sep

It’s pretty natural for actors to get into ruts in their careers, only to have them revitalized with some major performance. It was Matthew McConaughey’s turn a few years ago with Dallas Buyers Club, and 2015 is the year for Johnny Depp. Ever since the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie back in 2003, Depp has been kind of stuck with Jack Sparrow, even when he played Tonto in The Lone Ranger. It’s so refreshing to see what an actor of his caliber really has to offer, and you get to see that in Black Mass. Despite a few minor flaws, this film is definitely going to be one of the stand outs of this year and Johnny Depp’s performance isn’t the only reason why either.

28853fdf04e11a84746d32abb79b8d2ab9de0361

This is the story of one of America’s most dangerous and notorious gangsters, James “Whitey” Bulger (Johnny Depp). While Bulger is still just a small time gangster in South Boston, he is reunited with his childhood friend, John Conolly (Joel Edgerton), who has begun making a name for himself in the FBI. Conolly proposes to Whitey that they should form an “alliance” where he will feed Bulger information procured by the FBI, while Bulger will give some names and places of notorious Italian mobsters that have been giving the Irish gangs a hard time. As time goes on and both men rise in rank in their organizations, the walls begin closing in on both of them, and it becomes increasingly more difficult to cover their tracks.

The first thing I have to talk about is Johnny Depp’s performance. I mean, how can I not be excited about this. It’s been a few days since I’ve seen the movie and I still get all wound up just thinking about it. Johnny Depp can be a chameleon when it comes to acting and this is case and point. While I was watching Black Mass, I didn’t feel like I was watching Johnny Depp playing Whitey Bulger. I felt like it was Whitey Bulger. Everything from his posture, to his facial expressions, and how he delivered lines made him a terrifying force to be reckoned with. Props also have to go out to Joel Edgerton who gave the same kind of realistic performance. Finally, after getting used to him, Benedict Cumberbatch threw me through a loop with his higher pitched voice and Bostonian accent.

maxresdefault

The only thing that Black Mass has going against it is just how much content is mushed into its two hour run time. When I say that this movie is packed to the brim, I mean it really is. This movie could have easily been another hour long, and even a miniseries, but two hours just isn’t enough. The movie actually felt longer than it was because of how much stuff happens in it. Scott Cooper actually said that the film was originally three hours long, so if there were ever a director’s cut released, I’d love to see just how much was excluded from the finished product and if it would make the movie flow a little bit smoother. The pacing gets so weird and choppy at times because there’s so much stuff to fit in, finding the proper transition could be hard. It also made it hard to see how much time has passed or where everyone was.

Still, it’s understandable why the film makers would want to cram so much material into this movie. It’s all really interesting stuff, and the character of James Bulger was just asking for a movie like this. You know how in The Godfather you can get behind the Corleone family and in Scarface you can go along with some of Tony Montana’s doings? Not in Black Mass. Whitey Bulger is truly an evil human being with no moral compass whatsoever. In the beginning of the movie, there’s some humanity, but by the end the audience sees just how disassociated from society he really was. It’s also interesting to note that this isn’t just a biopic about Whitey Bulger. It’s also an exploration of a time when the FBI was corrupted and their security breached by this unholy alliance.

While Black Mass may not be the best gangster movie of the past ten or twenty years, it is one that’s going to be remembered. It’s sort of true that Johnny Depp carries the movie, but only because he’s so in character and the character is so intriguing that you can’t help but watch. It was a dark time in the history of the FBI and seeing them deal with that is just as interesting as everything else. This isn’t just a good movie, it’s a great movie. If some of the pacing issues were fixed, who knows how great it would be in the course of film history.