Tag Archives: matt damon

The Great Wall – Review

3 Mar

I recently did a review for Zhang Yimou’s 2011 war drama, The Flowers of War. In that review, I mention that Yimou is a very respectable film maker who has an especially strong talent for filming what I believe to be some of the most beautiful looking movies I’ve ever seen. His latest film is The Great Wall, a monster movie that involves protecting the Imperial City from creatures hell bent on destroying civilization as we know it. That combined with Yimou’s colorful and sweeping directorial style kind of made this a must see for me. Well, all I can say is that this film definitely looks great. That’s pretty much where the compliments end.

timthumb

William (Matt Damon) and Pero (Pedro Pascal) are two mercenaries scouring the East looking for “black powder,” which we now know as gunpowder. During their search, they end up at the Great Wall of China and are questioned about their intentions immediately upon their arrival. The two partners soon learn why the soldiers at the wall are so concerned about their motives. During a seemingly quiet afternoon, the wall is raided by alien monsters called the Tao Tie, whose goal is to penetrate the wall and continue on to the Imperial City. It doesn’t take long for William to come to a decision as to wether he wants to escape with Pero and another Englishman, Sir Ballard (Willem Dafoe), or if he would rather stay and defend the Great Wall with the newly appointed general, Lin Mae (Jing Tian).

I was excited for this movie for multiple reasons. First off, I was pumped to see Zhang Yimou tackle a big budget monster movie and have his style painted all over the movie. I was also just pumped to see another monster movie from Legendary, which has pretty much become the monster movie company for America. In these ways, the movie does succeed. When battles start happening, I got really into it. The special effects look kind of cartoony, but for some reason, that didn’t really bother me. I was taken aback by Yimou’s use of color and framing scenes to make them look as epic as possible. One of these shots in particular happened in the very first battle where you can see most of the battle in one super wide shot. Another really cool thing are the different regiments of the soldiers and the uniforms they wear to identify themselves. Honestly, in terms of style and scope, this movie stands tall.

np_20161228_jsmovie28_1472282

Like I said before, that’s pretty much where all of the good stuff ends. The Great Wall really isn’t all that good of a movie despite having a really cool premise. My biggest problem was the characters. I haven’t seen such poor development and writing in a really long time. Any scene that didn’t involve a battle or special effect of some kind fell flat. Like completely, utterly flat. It’s incredible how an epic period piece featuring alien monsters attacking the Great Wall of China could be so boring. There are a few characters worth something, but that’s not saying to much. William’s partner Pero has a good amount of one liners and a story that at least attempts to go somewhere before that’s shut down by some idiotic decisions from the writers. Lin Mae is also a pretty cool character who feels the most human out of anyone else. The worst offender of characters not worth anything is Sir Ballard. If you were to take Willem Dafoe out of this movie, nothing would be different. He’s completely wasted here.

I was also really bothered by the acting in this movie, but part of this also has to fall on the writers. There was so much clunky and awkward dialogue in this movie which only made me more distracted during the down time that I’ve already complained was boring enough. Like I said before, the only exceptions from this are Pero and Lin Mae. They weren’t perfect, but they were better than the rest. Honestly though, I was mostly shocked at how flat and uninspired Matt Damon was. I didn’t know until the end of the movie that he was supposed to be European, and I still don’t know exactly where he’s supposed to be from. His accent is on and off throughout the whole movie, and the way he delivers his lines is cringeworthy. Aside from his weird accent, he uses this over the top tough guy voice that wore thin on me after the second line of dialogue he had.

The Great Wall is a very disappointing movie. Throughout its run time, I saw a lot of hope for potential, but nothing really came of it. I will say that this is a fantastic looking movie with cool creature design and some excellent use of lighting and costume design. Everything else from the characters and their development to the structure of the narrative is flat, recycled, or just plain boring. As a monster movie, it works at the most basic of levels. As a movie to be appreciated and viewed for something more than that, it’s a failure.

Final Grade: C-

Jason Bourne – Review

2 Aug

Recently I did a review on all 3 of the original Bourne movies, and even threw in The Bourne Legacy because I apparently like cinematic torture. Yeah, that one was pretty awful. The original three films with Matt Damon as the titular character are, on the other hand, some of the greatest action films ever made, with The Bourne Ultimatum ranking up there with the best of the best. When the trailer was revealed for Jason Bourne, with Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass returning, I became as giddy as a school girl. There was a lot of hype around this movie, and it doesn’t quite seem to be fully living up to it. I may be biased in my opinion, but I honestly thought this was a pretty great thrill ride.

timthumb

All Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) has ever wanted is to be left alone. After the events of the original trilogy, Bourne is laying low and making a life as a fighter in underground fighting rings. For 10 years, he has been living under the radar until Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles) finds him and warns him of a new program the government has started called Operation Iron Hand and also reveals she has new information concerning Bourne’s father’s connection with Treadstone. The idea of learning more about why Bourne became part of the clandestine organization sends him back into the world he’s been trying to get away from. Hot on his tail are CIA bigwigs Heather Lee (Alicia Vikander), Director Robert Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones), and an assassin known only as the Asset (Vincent Cassel). This worldwide chase leads Bourne on a trail of clues that uncover more conspiracies and lies that ultimately ended with his mind becoming what it is today, and he wants revenge not only for himself, but for his father.

I should start by something that may come as a shock to hear, especially coming from someone like me who absolutely loves the Bourne trilogy. Jason Bourne didn’t really have to be made. They wrapped the story up pretty well in The Bourne Ultimatum, and it could have realistically been left at that. We live in a world, however, where sequels have become the norm and since this movie does exist, I whole heartedly welcome it. That being said, it doesn’t quite reach the heights of its predecessors. Jason knows who he is now, and by this point it kind of just felt like they were searching for anything that could possibly bring him back into the world of spies and espionage. For this one, we have conspiracies surrounding a social media network that the government wants to tap into and exploit, while also the plot about Jason’s father’s involvement in Treadstone and why they were surveilling him. This doesn’t make for the most interesting storyline, but there is plenty packed into the movie to make up for its missteps in terms of creating a highly captivating story.

Film Review Jason Bourne

The best thing about Jason Bourne is the action. I honestly can’t stress enough how awesome every action scene was. The first one that really hit me was a motorcycle chase through a riot in Greece. Not only was this a unique environment for a chase to happen, but it was shot so beautifully. This is a really nice looking movie, and that credit goes to how well Paul Greengrass can capture a movie like this, in an almost documentary style way. There’s also plenty of great fist fights that have become a staple in this series. Part of the fun of these movies is seeing the new ways that Bourne can disarm and take down an enemy. These scenes are relentless. The highlight of this movie, however, is a car chase that takes place through the busy streets of Las Vegas. I kid you not when I say that this car chase is one of the coolest parts of this entire series and is hands down the best car chase in any Bourne movie.

Something I’ve heard complaints about is the story involving a social media tycoon (played by Riz Ahmed) and his involvements with the CIA in a sort of Edward Snowden, NSA spying on people sort of thing. I didn’t have a problem with this one bit, and I even think it added a little something to the story. I really like how these movies always made me feel like stuff like what was in the movie was definitely happening, and part of that success was how the media was handled in the stories. This is a Bourne movie that takes place in a time where social media is a main source of news, and this is also a time where the government is taking advantage of platforms like this. Jason Bourne fits in very well with the time and uses this conspiracy and paranoia to help better the story.

Jason Bourne may not live up to some of the heights of its predecessors in some regards, but as a whole I think it stands up very well with the other movies in this series. The action is some of the best you’ll see all year, the performances are all pitch perfect, and it’s just awesome to see this character back doing what he does best. This is a quick paced thrill ride that has its share of flaws, but more than makes up for them which means I definitely recommend this film to any fans of the Bourne series.

The Bourne Series – Review Part II

28 Jan

Let’s get back to the Bourne series. In the first review, I stated that The Bourne Identity has been one of my favorite action films since I can remember, and that The Bourne Supremacy is a flawed but worthy sequel. Now we have The Bourne Ultimatum and the most recent entry, The Bourne Legacy. This is going to be a very conflicting review because one of these movies is quite frankly one of the best action movies ever made, and the other is an unnecessary mess that made me feel like I wasn’t even watching a Bourne movie. I think you could guess which one I’m talking about. Nevertheless, let’s get this started.

The series continued in 2007 with The Bourne Ultimatum.

The_Bourne_Ultimatum_(2007_film_poster)

Picking up right where The Bourne Supremacy left off, Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is trying to covertly make his way out of Moscow. Six weeks after his escape, the CIA begins tailing journalist Simon Ross (Paddy Considine) after he publishes articles about Bourne and is overheard on his phone talking about Operation Blackbriar. This forces Bourne to also track him to find who his source of all this information is. Now  back in the crosshairs of the CIA, specifically Deputy Director Noah Vosen (David Straithairn) and the more sympathetic Pamela Landy (Joan Allen), Bourne fights his way across the globe trying to find answers about his past and Operation Treadstone, which ultimately leads him back to New York City where the truth will all finally be revealed.

Way up high on the Mount Olympus of film, The Bourne Ultimatum acts as one of the main representatives of action. It’s everything you want in an action movie, but then also delivers an intelligent story and rich characters. I will say that the annoying Paul Greengrass shaky cam is still there, but the action is so wild that I could easily look past it. There are stunts that happen in this movie that goes to show you don’t need CGI for everything. One scene in particular shows a car going up a divider and spinning off of it into another car which causes both of them to roll out of control. Watching the special features on how they did that was absolutely incredible and makes this movie even more impressive.

The Bourne Ultimatum is easily the best film in the entire series. It reveals a lot about Bourne’s past, introduces new villains while reinforcing heroes we’ve come to love. There’s plenty of action and espionage to keep the most jaded and critical film goer at bay while also telling a really dark and intelligent story that mirrors the real world in some scary ways. My only real complaint is how Greengrass uses the camera in action sequences, but it really wasn’t as annoying as it was in The Bourne Supremacy. The bottom line is that this is one of the best action films ever to be made and deserves all of the praise and accolades that it receives.

After that masterpiece, there was a lot to live up to. What came next, however, was kind of weird. That was the 2012 film The Bourne Legacy.

The_Bourne_Legacy_Poster

Taking place during and after the events of The Bourne Ultimatum, The Bourne Legacy introduces Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner), a genetically enhanced super soldier who’s part of a CIA black op called Operation Outcome. The consequences of Bourne’s actions mixed with inner departmental problems forces Eric Byer (Edward Norton) to completely shut down Operation Outcome, and by that he means whipe out all of the agents working around the globe. They don’t count on Cross surviving the attack and how desperate he would be to get his hands on the pills that keep him genetically superior. He soon finds and enlists the help of Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), a biochemist who has analyzed and treated the agents of Operation Outcome. The two travel to the Philippines to inject Cross with a serum that will permanently keep him a step above the rest, but the CIA and local authorities seem to always be around every corner.

As I was watching The Bourne Legacy, I was really trying hard to get into it. Edward Norton and Rachel Weisz both give good performances, and Jeremy Renner makes Aaron Cross a very memorable and fully realized character. There were even a few scenes that were really cool, like a long take that has Cross scaling a house, going into a window, and shooting someone. That’s where it all ends. This movie does not feel like an addition to the Bourne series. There’s only a few scenes with characters from the trilogy and brief mentioning of things that Bourne is doing. Cross doesn’t even really qualify as a “legacy” because he’s part of Operation Outcome and not Treadstone. I don’t understand this movie in the least.

The Bourne Legacy is really missing out on a lot of key elements that make the other movies great. For one thing, the sense of completely grounded realism is gone for me with the introduction of these pills that make super soldiers. Another thing is that the action is less than stellar and even boring. Finally, there just isn’t enough of a connection to the other movies. It’s one thing that Jason Bourne isn’t even in this, but there was still a lot of room to make a spin off that really brings the movies together. Unfortunately we got this mess of a movie.

Well there you have it. The first three Bourne movies are spectacular action movies that helped redefine what the genre should be while also telling a story full of intriguing characters and memorable twists. Just don’t let The Bourne Legacy sour what those movies accomplished.

The Bourne Series – Review Part I

24 Jan

This is a review I’ve been wanting to do for a long time since these movies have a very special place in my film loving heart. The Bourne Identity was one of my most watched movies when I was growing up, and was actually one of the first “real” movies I ever sat down, watched, and appreciated. Instead of just reviewing that one, however, I want to take a look at the entire series. These are the kind of spy movies I really like because I feel like stuff like this could actually happen. I have a lot to say about this series so why not just get started?

The Bourne Identity kickstarted the series with its release in 2002.

BourneIdentityfilm

On a stormy night in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, a man (Matt Damon) is pulled out of the water by a group of fisherman. He has been shot three times, has a bank number lodged into his hip, and he can’t remember who he is and how he got there. Upon arriving in Zürich, the man discovers his name to be Jason Bourne, but he also finds that he being chased by all types of law enforcement. He enlists the help of a desperate woman, Marie (Franka Potente), who he offers to pay a grand sum of money in exchange for a ride. As they travel to Paris to find out more about Bourne’s identity, Treadstone, a CIA black operation led by Alexander Conklin (Chris Cooper),  sends out all of their sleeper agents to track down Bourne and take him out before he does anymore damage to the CIA.

The Bourne Identity is one of the movies I watched a lot when I was younger, so it’s one of the movies that really got me into movies as much as I am today. I’ve seen and heard a lot of people say that this film breathed new life into the stale action genre of the early 2000s, and I can definitely see that, since a lot of action/thriller films that came after this one drew a lot of creative inspiration. This film is a perfect combination of espionage and action, with a villainous section of the CIA going against a one man war machine that is Jason Bourne. This makes for many great action sequences, car chases, and games of cat and mouse that happen throughout Europe. It’s a spy movie of the highest degree.

This movie was really fun to re-watch after not having seen it for quite a few years. It really hasn’t lost it’s luster and still remains as thrilling as it’s always been. While people knew who Matt Damon was before this, this is the movie that put him to the status of being a Hollywood superstar. This is also the film that successfully kickstarted a whole franchise. If you can’t tell already, I love this movie.

In 2004, The Bourne Supremacy was released. While definitely superior in some regards to the first film, there are some major drawbacks that sour the movie more than they should have.

Supremacy_poster_01

For two year, Jason Bourne and Marie have been laying low and keeping their distance from Treadstone and the CIA. All they have built soon shatters when Bourne is framed for the murder of CIA agents who were intercepting documents with proof of who stole $20 million of CIA money. This forces Bourne to come out of hiding, clear his name, and get his revenge on whoever tainted his name and ruined the quiet life he made for himself. This time around, Bourne is forced to go up against the CIA Deputy Directors Pamela Landy (Joan Allen) and Ward Abbot (Brian Cox), while also facing off against Russian Secret Service agent Kirill (Karl Urban) in a war that spreads over multiple countries and cities around the world.

The Bourne Supremacy is a much different specimen that The Bourne Identity. It’s almost as if two different people made these movies. Wait, that’s because they did. Doug Liman was responsible for the very cinematic first film, while Paul Greengrass took the series into a whole other direction with his almost faux documentary style film making. Greengrass would later go on to use this style in films like United 93 and Captain Philips, and they work really well in those movies. Unfortunately, it isn’t always the best choice for this film. The scenes of dialogue are great because it really brings a sense of realism to the story, especially with the handheld look. The fights suffer completely, however, and that’s a shame since the fights are such a big part in these movies. The action often becomes so incomprehensible, I had to just stop looking at it. Major points are deducted from The Bourne Supremacy because of that.

What The Bourne Supremacy does really well is tell a more intriguing story than its predecessor. The first film sort of just introduced the character and his situation, but this film goes deep into the rabbit hole that is Treadstone and shows just how corrupt it is. What’s fun about this is because it’s all very easy to believe something like this happening, and that makes all of the thrills completely worth it. It injects the series with something that can be a real life event. That being said, while I’m not a huge fan of how this movie is made, I can’e deny that it tells a great story, and that’s the most important thing to me.

The Bourne Identity and The Bourne Supremacy are a step above average spy thrillers and are part of the reason why I love movies as much as I do. I still have a few more movies to write about, so keep an eye out for the next part where I talk about The Bourne Ultimatum and The Bourne Legacy.

The Martian – Review

7 Oct

Ridley Scott is known for his ability to craft some of the most epic movies in modern film. GladiatorKingdom of Heaven, and even the crime epic American Gangster all fit nicely into this category of huge films. Now we have a movie based off of a novel by Andy Weir, and in my opinion, this is a pretty absurd choice of book to make a movie out of. Not because it’s a bad story, but it’s actually too great of a story with different story lines that not only spans continents, but planets. If I was a major Hollywood film maker, a project like this would intimidate me, but leave it to Ridley Scott to take the source material and make it into one of the stand out movies of 2015.

230490

In the not too distant future, NASA sends a group of scientists to Mars to learn more about the desolate, red planet. When a violent storm cuts the mission short, botanist Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is presumed dead. NASA releases the news, but are then shocked to learn that Watney is alive and well and has been stranded on Mars. Watney knows that it may be up to four years before the next mission can arrive to rescue him, so he begins working to make the dead soil of Mars into a place that he can live on. Meanwhile, NASA director Teddy Sanders (Jeff Daniels) and Ares III mission director Vincent Kapoor (Chiwetel Ejiofor) start devising multiple different plans to not only provide food for Watney, but also find a way to rescue him from Mars as soon as possible. This may ultimately fall on Ares III commander Melissa Lewis (Jessica Chastain) and the rest of her crew, forcing them to turn back around and get Watney home.

I can’t stress it enough that the story of The Martian felt absolutely enormous. Not only does it cover over a year of time, but also involves so many different characters that each have very important jobs to do throughout the entire ordeal. There isn’t one character that felt wasted throughout the whole thing. It was also cool to see that even for some of the most minor roles, good actors would still fill their shoes. For example, one of the people that completely changes how NASA approaches the whole problem is astronomer Rich Purnell played by Donald Glover. This character is only in a few scenes for a few minutes, but they still casted a great actor to fill that role. Other than the people I already mentioned, there’s other actors like Kate Mara, Michael Peña, Benedict Wong, and Sean Bean. It’s one of the best casts that’s been assembled in recent memory.

fb58b92da01f4f2b830f6a70670087f2_c55-0-1985-1125_s561x327

What seems to be surprising most critics and audiences is how lighthearted this movie actually is. Sure, it’s very dramatic and some of the scenes can get really intense, but I found myself laughing through a lot of the movie. The character of Mark Watney is literally what this story needs. Instead of letting his situation get the better of him, he remains optimistic and cracks jokes throughout the entire movie. If it wasn’t for him keeping his good humor, this would be an unbearably depressing movie. It’s also cool to see how his optimism affects the other characters and keep them from throwing in the towel before something can be done. Pretty much, this movie keeps you feeling great the whole time, and never did I feel like the situation was absolutely hopeless.

I can’t really find anything to complain about with The Martian. Not only is it very well written and acted, but it’s also a beautiful looking movie. In order to get the perfect look for his Martian landscape Scott and the rest of his special effects team filmed in Wadi Rum, Jordan, which has a red desert. That location shooting combined with excellent special effects makes this film visually immersive. Harry Gregson-Williams’ low key score also accentuates the drama very nicely.

While Ridley Scott hasn’t made perfect movies and has recently slipped a little bit, The Martian is proof that he is still able to take huge stories, compress them, and successfully put them on film. This film is an achievement of special effects, but also stands out with it’s quick writing, believable characters, and feeling of hope and good humor that spans the entire two and a half hour run time. Nothing in this movie feels wasted, which means everything feels important and that isn’t easy to do. This is an outstanding movie.

Elysium – Review

2 Jan

Neil Blomkamp crash landed on the sci-fi radar in 2009 with his contemporary masterpiece District 9. In my opinion, this is the most important science fiction film of the past twenty years, so when his second film, Elysium, was released in 2013, the film had a lot to live up to. It’s true that Elysium doesn’t quite reach the same heights as District 9, but I wasn’t really expecting it to. Once you stop comparing to Blomkamp’s first film, you can see that Elysium is a really good movie that, unfortunately, gets a little heavy handed at times.

elysium-poster-low-res

In 2154, the Earth is an absolute wreck after problems such as overpopulation have completely destroyed the environment and crippled society. This is just a problem for your average everyday citizen. The more wealthy, upper class citizen can live a life of luxury that can span as many lifetimes as they desire on a huge Stanford-torus space station called Elysium. Max Da Costa (Matt Damon) has always dreamed of making it to Elysium, but never actually expected to. One day at work, he is exposed to lethal amounts of radiation and only has five days to live, with his only chance of life being a medical pod on Elysium. To get up there he meets with his old associate Spider (Wagner Moura), who attaches a powerful mechanical exoskeleton to Max and begin a mission that will ultimately end on Elysium. Max has caught the eye of the Elysium Secretary of Defense Jessica Delacourt (Jodie Foster), who aims to prevent them from getting to Elysium, so she hires her man on the ground, Kruger (Sharlto Copely), to stop them.

As with District 9Elysium is more than just a science fiction story that you can shut your brain off for and just enjoy the ride. Sure, if you want to you’re allowed to, but you’d be missing a lot of the movie’s appeal. The message here is just about as obvious as a movie can get, and Blomkamp doesn’t seem to care if he lays it on as heavy as he can. In my opinion, that is the movie’s main weakness. Just looking at the plot summary I just wrote, you can probably figure out what the message of the movie is, even if you had no prior knowledge. The movie just feels a little bit preachy. Still there are a lot more themes that aren’t as heavy handed, such as themes of transhumanism.

elysium_610

The design of Elysium is really something to behold. The space station itself is a Stanford-torus design that was thought up at Stanford University by NASA in 1975. This makes the movie even more believable than it would be. But, this movie is very believable. The problems on Earth can already be seen here and now, so the time period of 2154 makes the Earth in this movie seem possible. Also, the weaponry and set design all seem like a very realistic depiction of a possible future. I’m no expert of what can be expected in terms of technology within the next hundred to two hundred years, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it looks very much like it does in Elysium, hopefully not as dystopic. The only piece of technology that I don’t really buy is essential to the story. That is the medical pods on Elysium that heal you, no matter what the ailment. While it is a really cool idea, I just can’t see that happening any time soon, although it is a necessary piece of the story.

Now I don’t normally spend an entire section on just one person, but I feel like I need to. The performances are fine in this movie, other than Foster, whose performance is awkward at best. Who not only steals every scene he’s in, but runs off with the entire movie is Sharlto Copely. Wow. Having worked with Blomkamp before in District 9, it isn’t really surprising to see him again in Elysium. His performance as the sleeper agent Kruger is horrifying. He’s one of those characters that make you uncomfortable every time he’s on screen because, for one, he just looks gross, but also you never quite know what he’s going to do next or what he’s capable of. Copely plays this psycho spot on, and I firmly believe that no one else could have played this part and done it the justice that Copely did. It may be one of my new favorite screen performances.

Elysium-Sharlto-Copley-Kruger

 

So, as I expected, Elysium is another success by a new science fiction titan, Neil Blomkamp. If you’re expecting it to be the next District 9, it isn’t, but it is a step above a lot of the movies that come out nowadays, especially in terms of science fiction. It’s a powerful blockbuster with an important, if not heavy handed message. Plus a lot of people explode in this movie, so expect a lot of that. But hey, I’m not complaining about that! I’d strongly recommend Elysium. It’s a fun blockbuster that makes me excited to see what Blomkamp will do in the future.

Contagion – Review

20 Jan

The unknown is a pretty terrifying thing, but what happens when the unknown goes viral? Panic? Desperate people doing desperate things? A massive fight for survival is a definite. Disease is, believe it or not, a natural disaster. AIDS, SARS, and the flu are just a few examples. They’re small quiet killers that don’t care who they attack. Steven Soderbergh recognizes this and realistically displays such terror in Contagion.

Contagion_Poster

After a businesswoman (Gwyneth Paltrow) returns from a trip, she becomes seriously ill leaving her husband (Matt Damon) to care for her son and his daughter by himself. This virus soon spreads throughout the world leaving a trail of destruction in its path. Dr. Cheever (Laurence Fishburne) and Dr. Mears (Kate Winslet) work for the CDC and try to not only find a cure, but also keep the situation as calm and sterile as possible. Alan Krumwiede (Jude Law) is a internet blogger who decides to use the outbreak to make quick cash and powerful step above the bureaucrats. Finally, Dr. Orantes (Marion Cotillard) works for the World Health Organization in Hong Kong, but is soon kidnapped and held ransom until a cure can be found for the disease.

The narrative presented by Soderbergh is impressive. He did the same kind of thing with his masterpiece from 2000, Traffic. This narrative style is called “hyperlink narrative.” This style involves having multiple characters with their own plots and devices and having them interwoven with each other to make a sort of collage of humanity over time and space. It is a very challenging type of film to fully comprehend, even if you consider yourself to be the world’s biggest cinephile, and Contagion is no exception.

images

 

The best part of the movie is trying to keep up with all of the story lines thrown at you at once and seeing all of the connections. In that same respect it would be difficult to really care about each character since we are constantly jumping around. This really isn’t a problem in this movie though thanks to the writing/acting combination. All of the actors (there’s too many to name them all individually) are great. My personal favorite is Jude Law since I was never quite sure what he was up to and he was also very outspoken. In real life, I would hate this guy, but in the movie he was great.

While I said “this isn’t really a problem” does not mean that it wasn’t at all. This movie is far from being perfect and teeters comfortably on the good/great line. The scale of it s great, but it is stretched way too much. There is a certain character in this movie (coughcoughmarioncotillard) that I didn’t care about in the least. She had all the building blocks to be memorable, but she wasn’t used enough and when she was onscreen she didn’t have the same force as the other characters did. It’s really a shame because I feel like her character would be important.

ht_contagion_jennifer_ehle_ll_110906_wg

 

Contagion will certainly succeed in freaking you out. It will also succeed in making you think of how the governmental powers of the world may realistically act during a situation like this. The narrative approach of this movie is perfect for the genre, but not done as well as I would have liked. I appreciate the realism and the attempt. It’s a brilliantly planned and and thought out movie. Unfortunately, the writing of certain characters and scenes make people and events feel not so important. This is a good movie that was a little too long and stretched out. If you miss this movie, you’ll survive, but giving it a chance wouldn’t hurt either.