Tag Archives: mind bending

The Game – Review

30 Sep

I’m probably not alone in thinking that David Fincher is one of the best directors working in Hollywood right now. If you take a look at his filmography, there doesn’t seem to be a genre that he can’t tackle. His second film (after the entirely mediocre Alien 3), the superb horror/mystery Seven, scared that crap out of audiences, but also kept them guessing up until the very end. His other films like Fight ClubThe Social Network, and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo were each a part of a different genre, but were all exceptional character studies. Of course, these are just a few noteworthy examples, which were also quite clear in his third effort, The Game. While it doesn’t quite pack the punch that Seven did, it is still a very fine example of work as a thriller and also provides an excellent mind game for the viewer.

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Nicholas Van Orton (Michael Douglas) is an investment banker who can’t seem to get a grasp on his life despite his wealth. His wife has divorced him, his brother is estranged, and his house only serves to remind him of just how lonely and empty he is. When his estranged brother, Conrad (Sean Penn), shows up for his birthday, he gives Nicholas a business card as a gift for Consumer Recreation Services, which he claims will change his life. Nicholas decides to give it a try and meets with an associate of CRS (James Rebhorn), who gets him all set up and explains that it’s all just a game. As Nicholas’ game starts, he finds that his life and all of the work that was put into starts to crumble all around him with no explanation or conceivable reason. The only clues he may have lie with a mysterious woman, Christine (Deborah Kara Unger), who may or may not be involved with what’s going on with Nicholas.

A movie with a plot like that leaves a lot of room for some crazy stuff to happen, and believe you me, crazy stuff happens for a good majority of the movie. At first, I felt a little disappointed, because everything that was happening just seemed like another obstacle for Nicholas to get over, and what I was expecting was a movie that was going to toy with my mind and expectations. If only I had a little patience. What I mistook for a wasted opportunity was actually just excellent pacing. The movie starts off a little slow and progressively gets stranger and stranger until I finally felt like I was all wrapped up in this unbelievable game along with Nicholas.

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What actually got me curious about this movie was that I heard how twist turny and mind boggling it is. I love movies like that; the ones that are in the same vein as Donnie Darko and PrimerThe Game is now going to be my new go to example for a movie that takes your brain and shakes it around so much that it leaves you feeling tired by the very end. There have been times where I go into a movie expecting that, and by the end I’m disappointed that it really didn’t make me think out the puzzle all that much. Trying to solve the mystery of a movie like The Game is a large part of the fun. This one did not disappoint. Fincher and screenwriters John Brancato and Michael Ferris lay this movie out in such a way that I at first though I knew what was going on, but as the movie progressed I was left wondering if anything that was going on was real or just part of the game, which is exactly what Michael Douglas’ character was going through. Now that’s clever film making.

Something that seems to bother people about this movie, and rightfully so, is just how ludicrous it is. I’m not the kind of person who gets too upset over a movie that seems completely implausible, because it is a movie after all, but there are some limits. The Game had its moments where I would think to myself that it would be highly, highly unlikely for something like that to happen. A counter argument would be that CRS is just so exact with their work that they would make it happen, especially given all of the tests they give to Nicholas when he starts up the game. Still, it would still be a really difficult task that kind of pushes the limits of what is acceptable with suspending disbelief. The movie is saved though by how believable Douglas plays everything and how twisted the movie can get.

As a mind boggling thriller, David Fincher’s The Game is a prime example of the genre and has gone on to become a cult classic. It would be very easy to pick this movie apart and find all of the flaws, but that would ruin the fun of the story. A story that left me scratching my head and on the edge of my seat until the very end. If you’re able to suspend your disbelief and enjoy movies that challenge you to think, and think quickly, then I can easily recommend The Game. Just be prepared for a wild ride.

Source Code – Review

5 Oct

As a person who spends a fair share of his waking hours on trains, Source Code wasn’t exactly my dream premise when in come to comfortability, but other than how I felt in relation to reality I was wholly impressed. I didn’t know what to think going into this movie. I heard a lot of good things, but I wasn’t totally convinced. I had to dive in and see for myself that Source Code is a fantastic science fiction mystery and genuine human drama.

 

Captain Colter Stevens (Jake Gyllenhaal) wakes up on a train in Chicago without any explanation on how he got there. The mystery thickens when he keeps getting called “Sean” by the woman sitting across from him (Michelle Monaghan). The train explodes and he is brought back to a dark capsule and talked to by Captain Colleen Goodwin (Vera Farmiga), who explains that the train is a “source code” made up of the last eight minutes of Sean’s life, and that Stevens must navigate this source code and find out who bombed the train so that he can be stopped in the real world from bombing the city of Chicago with a dirty bomb.

The plot and how deep it goes down the rabbit hole is enough to make your head spin. It brings back the confusing memories of Inception, The Matrix, and even Groundhog Day. The layer of pure drama that was completely unexpected puts this movie on a much higher level than I was expecting it to be. I wasn’t just interested in unravelling the mystery of the bomber and the source code, but I was also interested in the human side and the emotional response that Colter Stevens is feeling because of this experience.

 

You might think that watching the same thing over and over again would get boring. Not so. Just like the protagonist, I tried to pick out little idiosyncrasies or clues to point me to the bomber. Also, it’s interesting to see how the way the conflict is approached has a very large effect on the events leading to the inevitable outcome. Stevens tries all sorts of tactics from violent to more stealthily. There’s also a heightened feeling of suspense since he has to complete his mission in only eight minutes.

Writer Ben Ripley and director Duncan Jones have crafted an outstanding story that, like I said, will make your head spin. The imagination behind this is brilliant, even if there are some elements of the plot that seem way too unlikely. I don’t want to talk too much about the ending out of fear of giving it away, but there is something about it that doesn’t sit right with me even though I was happy with it. In my opinion it doesn’t fit right with the story and everything explained in it, but it’s how I wanted it to end so I can’t say if I love the ending or not.

 

Films that challenge an audience to think are desperately needed in a time when movies baby the audience and hold their hands to get the safely to the conclusion so absolutely no discussion is necessary and they can get back to their lives. Source Code challenges the viewer to think about what makes up the source code and the morality behind it, and how this morality relates to real world events. It’s a surprisingly deep film that has an intriguing story, excellent performances, and mind blowing layers. Don’t miss out on Source Code.