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Logan – Review

6 Mar

The X-Men series of movies seems to have been around forever. The beloved team of mutant heroes were shown onscreen in live action for the first time back in 2000, and there are a few of these actors that are still playing the same roles almost two decades later. In this case, I’m talking about Hugh Jackman as Wolverine/Logan and Patrick Stewart as Charles Xavier/Professor X. Now, here in 2017, we’re seeing the departure of these two actors from their respective roles in the newest film of this series, Logan. What a movie to go out on. This isn’t just the best X-Men film to date, it may very well reign supreme as the best superhero film ever made.

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In the not so distant future, mutants are on the brink of extinction and have to go into hiding to avoid certain death squads and other forces that want them gone. One of these mutants is a much older Logan (Hugh Jackman) who is working as a limo driver to support his vices while also supporting a sickly Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart). A chance encounter with a nurse ends with a little girl, Laura (Dafne Keen), being left with Logan and Charles who are tasked with transporting Laura to a safe haven for mutants. Laura is soon revealed as a mutant test subject known as X-23, who is on the run from the company’s head of security, Donald Pierce (Boyd Holbrook), and his soldiers called the Reavers. Against Logan’s best wishes and attempts to rid himself of the responsibility, he takes both Laura and Charles out of their compound and begin their journey to the haven with Donald and his men hot on their tails.

There’s so much about this movie I want to dive right into that I have to force myself to stay focused. Let’s talk story first. I tried to keep my summary as vague as possible because there are so many layers and feelings that start to peel away as the movie goes on. It would be impossible to try and cover everything that is important in this movie because there isn’t one frame that is unnecessary. The story to Logan isn’t like any other X-Men movie, and it plays out like a very intense character drama as much as it is a graphically violent action film. The main reason this movie worked so well for me is because of how deep the story is and how it explored parts of these characters that were never seen before. The story is about Logan and Charles protecting X-23, but it’s also a story of family, regret, and severe, relentless pain. It’s can be a rough one at times, but I commend writer/director James Mangold and his co-writers for going there.

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The decision to make Logan rated R was a very smart move from 20th Century Fox, especially after the over the top success of Deadpool. This works great for the drama that I’ve already talked about as well as the action sequences. Let’s talk action, now. This is still a superhero movie, and a superhero movie completely devoid of action would be weird. Wolverine has always been viewed as an angry character prone to violent outbursts, and we’ve seen that in previous X-Men movies, but never like what I’ve just witnessed in Logan. This is Wolverine at his most unhinged. Limbs fly, heads roll, and the scenery is often times showered with pieces of whoever got in Logan’s way. What’s cool about it, also, is that it isn’t violence for the sake of violence. There’s a fair amount of action sequences that go heavy on the violence, but it has weight backing it up, and it never gets to a level that’s solely exploitive and gratuitous. It’s very well handled and was never anything less than exciting.

Finally, Logan has an excellent cast of characters and actors who play them to perfection. Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart have been playing these parts for years, so it’s pretty clear that they have their roles completely covered. Stewart gives a subtle and often sad performance here, where we see Professor X in ways that I’ve never thought I would. As for Hugh Jackman, this is simply his best performance. It’s controlled while also being ferocious, but the quieter and more contemplative scenes is where Jackman really shines by making Logan so vulnerable and appear so broken. There’s also some great newcomers to the series that are memorable. Dafne Keen, despite her relatively young age, is outstanding as X-23 and can really hold her own in terms of the ferociousness that is expected from the character. I also really enjoyed Boyd Holbrook’s portrayal of Donald Pierce, whose villainy oozed through every scene he was in. It’s exactly how I like my comic book bad guys.

I really wasn’t a fan of X-Men Origins or The Wolverine so I was really hoping that Logan was going to do the character right. Well, it sure does and it does even better than I could have hoped. It’s sad to see Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart bowing out of their roles, but this was the send off that they deserved. This is a powerful film that has some really heavy storytelling that will leave you teary eyed yet incredibly satisfied. This is the best written and executed entry of all the X-Men films and it brings something new and exciting to the superhero genre that can potentially change the game. I absolutely loved Logan.

Final Grade: A+

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Star Trek: The Next Generation Movies – Part 2

12 Nov

So here we have the final two movies in the Next Generation movie series. In the last review, I talked about Star Trek: Generations and Star Trek: First ContactGenerations was an acceptable entry into the series of feature films but didn’t really blow me away while First Contact was a rollicking good time and was exactly the kind of thing I wanted with this particular crew. This time, I’m going to look at Star Trek: Insurrection and Star Trek: Nemesis and see if they hold up to their predecessors.

Jonathan Frakes returned to the director’s chair after helming First Contact to make the 1998 film Star Trek: Insurrection.

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After Data (Brent Spiner) goes haywire while on a mission with Federation and Son’a explorers, Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) and the rest of the Enterprise travel to their location on an isolated planet. Their original mission was to study the quaint Ba’ku people, but upon recovering Data and repairing his positronic brain, it becomes clear that the Son’a and Admiral Dougherty’s (Anthony Zerbe) intentions are much more sinister. The leader of the Son’a, Ru’afo (F. Murray Abraham) along with Federation help is attempting to move the Ba’ku off their home planet in order to remove the healing properties from the rings around the planet which will make the land uninhabitable. Picard now faces a choice to either stay on the side of the Federation and its Admiral, or defy his orders and defend the peaceful Ba’ku from forceful relocation.

I see this movie get pushed to the side a lot because it feels too much like an extended episode of The Next Generation. I completely agree, but that doesn’t detract too much from it. While watching Insurrection, I wasn’t too impressed, but then I got to thinking and reading more about it and it’s actually better than people make it out to be. In this movie, we see Picard make a very difficult choice to defy the Federation that he loves so much in order to protect the rights of the defenseless Ba’ku. While this fits in with Star Trek highlighting real world issues in their science fiction universe, it also features a performance by Patrick Stewart that really shines.

Jonathan Frakes, who also plays Will Riker, is back directing this one since his work on First Contact proved very effective. While it isn’t as sharp as First Contact was, Insurrection is a still a visually exciting film with the special effects and performances you’ve come to expect with Star Trek. I have to give special attention to the make up work on the Son’a. Their skin one their faces being pulled all the way back makes them a horrifying villain to look at, and F. Murray Abraham’s performance as Ru’afo just solidifies their coolness in my mind. For a villain we’ve never seen before, they definitely make an impact.

Star Trek: Insurrection isn’t one of the best Star Trek films, but it’s certainly not as bad as The Final Frontier. This movie definitely feels like a long episode of The Next Generation, but that just means it feels like another adventure with a crew that I’ve come to know very well. I can’t really complain about that. Some parts do tend to drag and there are a few story arcs that lead to nowhere, but the action, characters, and special effects all work in the movie’s favor along with the choices Picard and the others have to make.

Final Grade: B

In 2002, the adventures of the crew of The Next Generation finally came to an end with Star Trek: Nemesis.

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After the assassinations of multiple members of the Romulan Senate, a new Praetor is put into power. As a result, the Enterprise is ordered to Romulus on a diplomatic mission to see that this exchange of powers goes over smoothly with the new Praetor being of Reman descent, which is the race that the Romulans use as slaves and cannon fodder. The new leader is in fact a human named Shinzon (Tom Hardy) who has a very special and unsettling connection to Captain Picard. When it becomes clear that Shinzon is only using his new power to not only conquer Romulus, but also Earth, Picard and the crew of the Enterprise begin a hopeless fight against Shinzon’s technologically superior flag ship. With the fight growing bleaker by the second, Picard is forced to use drastic measures that pushes the limit of his ship and crew.

After 7 seasons of the show and 4 movies, it’s clear by this point that this particular series is running out of steam. I have to say, though, Nemesis insures that these characters that people grew to love so much really get a send off. Unfortunately, this send off is very under appreciated and I feel like I’m in the minority of people that really liked this movie a lot. After First Contact, I think this movie is the best of The Next Generation films. There’s plenty of action and excitement, and despite a budget that wasn’t too great, there are some really cool special effects. The last 45 minutes or so is a space battle that really gets the heart pounding, and it highlights various members of the crew who each have their own time in the spotlight. Finally, there’s a moment in this movie that is one of the most heartbreaking in the entire franchise.

Star Trek: Nemesis is a very exciting movie that is full of action and really gives closure to these characters. The main cast are all great and perform like they always have. The best new addition is definitely Tom Hardy as the villainous Shinzon. He just oozes corruption and yuckiness while also appearing pathetic and sickly. This isn’t a perfect Star Trek movie. Leave that to The Wrath of Khan, but I will say it’s a damn entertaining one and it’s, in my own opinion, a great send off to the crew of The Next Generation

Final Grade: A-

With this series finally at a close, it’s pretty nice that there aren’t any real stinkers in the mix. A few of these movies are better than others, but none of them fall into the pit that was created by The Final Frontier. For fans of this franchise, all of these movies are worth a watch on some level. Live long and prosper.

Star Trek: The Next Generation Movies – Part 1

4 Nov

A little while ago, I did a couple of review on the original Star Trek movies. Overall, it’s an epic series of movies, save for a few bad eggs. There was still a lot more great than bad, so I was pleased. It would be wrong to talk about those movies and leave the more recent Next Generation movies in the dark. Wether you like the original series or The Next Generation better is a different story. I personally think that both have their own unique strengths that hold them both up very well. That may be a cop out answer, but you can’t make me choose. Anyway, let’s get started with the first part of my reviews.

The first movie to feature The Next Generation cast was the 1994 film Star Trek: Generations. The interesting thing about this one is that it also features some cast of the original series. Could it possibly live up to that kind of potential?

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In the past, James Kirk (William Shatner), Pavel Chekov (Walter Koenig), and Montgomery Scott (James Doohan) are guests for the maiden voyage of the USS Enterprise-B. After answering a distress call involving ships caught in an energy ribbon, the Enterprise-B also gets damaged and Kirk is apparently killed. In the time of the the Enterprise-D, Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) and the rest of the crew are called to investigate an incident on a space observatory where they find Dr. Soran (Malcolm McDowell), an El-Aurian who was also saved from the energy ribbon by the Enterprise-B. It soon becomes clear that Soran’s motives to get closer to the ribbon are not scientific, but personal as he will do anything, including destroy an entire planetary system to just reenter the ribbon, which is a place that time does not exist and a person can travel and do whatever they want. In order to stop Soran, Picard relies on an old Starfleet legend: James Kirk, who has also been trapped in the ribbon for all these years.

There isn’t really a whole lot to say about Generations. It’s great to see the crew of The Next Generation finally get their own big budget movie, and it’s also cool to see some older faces from the original series in the same movie. There isn’t much inherently wrong with this film, but by the time the credits begin to roll you can’t help but feel you’ve watched a weak entry into the series. The best way to describe this movie is just as a longer and more expensive episode of The Next Generation. The whole plot involving the energy ribbon and being able to enter it and travel in time is just the kind of thing you would see in one of the cool episodes of the series, but I’m not sure that’s enough to really carry a feature film.

That’s not to say that there aren’t some stand out parts of Generations. The crew all do great in their first time together on the big screen, and McDowell’s villainous performance as Soran is both tragic and sinister which makes him a perfect fit for this series. There’s also some excellent comedic relief since Data fits himself with Doctor Soong’s emotion chip that he gets off Lore towards the end of the series. Finally seeing Data truly understand emotions is funny and, in some odd nerdy way, makes me proud. This isn’t an excellent entry into the series, but it also isn’t a bad one. This movie has enough to make fans happy, but will also leave them wanting a bit more. I say it’s worth a watch.

Final Grade: B

Two years later in 1996, the crew of The Next Generation got their very own movie where no other character from the original series made an appearance. This film was Star Trek: First Contact.

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Ever since being assimilated by the Borg, Captain Jean-Luc Picard has never fully recovered from his experience. Now, he’s forced to face his most dangerous enemy yet again as they begin their assault on Earth. After defeating the Borg Cube, a sphere is released from the ship and sent through time with the plans of killing Zefram Cochrane (James Cromwell) before he can create the first warp engine and establish first contact with an alien race. This will make humanity more susceptible to the Borg and their mission of assimilation. Luckily, the Enterprise manages to travel through time as well, and fight back the Borg and aid Cochrane in his attempts to repair the warp engine. For those left on board the Enterprise, however, things don’t look so good as the Borg sneak onto the ship and wage an all out war with the crew.

Take everything cool in Generations and make it even cooler, and the result is First Contact. This is how you make a high quality Star Trek film. So far, this is one of the best entries in the entire franchise, including the original series. For starters, the Borg are my favorite villains in Star Trek, and making them the main antagonists for this film was a great idea. It brings a lot of the canon from the show and adds even more to it, while also revealing the man Cochrane really was, rather than the hero Star Fleet has made him out to be. There’s a lot of themes about humanity and what it means to be human and good, which seems to be the prime directive for the writers of Star Trek. It’s themes like this that feel all the more highlighted when you’re watching a feature film rather than an episode on t.v.

Along with improving the villain and the storytelling, First Contact also amps up the action and characterization. The main draw to watch Star Trek is to see the crews, whoever they may be, work together in such unison that no problem appears to big for them to handle, even at the most dire of moments. In this film, the crew is split up doing equally important things, which means their screen time is never wasted. On Earth, the scenes are much quieter, but the Enterprise is where all the action is. There’s one scene in particular that takes place on the outside of the Enterprise that might be my favorite scene in any Star Trek movie. The space battle in the beginning is another highlight in an already outstanding film.

For fans of The Next Generation, this is the Star Trek movie for you. It shows all of the strengths and weaknesses of the characters very clearly while also beefing up the canon that has already been established. There’s great acting, a great villain, and many memorable scenes that will keep your eyes glued to the screen.

Final Grade: A

So that’s just the start of my reviews for The Next Generation movies. Up next, I’ll be looking at Insurrection and Nemesis.

Green Room – Review

17 May

I’m not saying that the horror genre is completely saved, but what I will say is that there has been a major step up in the genre thanks to indie film makers. Within the past year we’ve had some excellent independent horror films like It Follows and The Witch grace theaters with the intelligence and originality that I love seeing movies like this. Now we have Jeremy Saulnier’s newest film, Green Room, which can be added to this new echelon of horror. This is a bloody, suspenseful, and exhausting movie that puts new faith in no holds barred horror film making and made me jealous that I didn’t make this movie myself.

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Pat (Anton Yelchin), who is in a punk band with his friends called The Ain’t Rights, is in the middle of a pretty unsuccessful west coast tour. After a show in Seaside, Oregon that is a complete bust, they are hired to do a gig in the backwoods of Portland in a club that is owned by a group of neo-Nazis. While the show itself goes fine, things take a turn for the worst when Pat stumbles upon a murder that took place in the green room backstage. Now Pat and his friends are being held by the skin heads and their leader, Darcy (Patrick Stewart). Darcy and his crew have no desire to let the band leave alive, which means the group of inept punks have to band together, strategize, and fight their way to freedom.

I love movies that take place in one location because I feel like it adds something more immediate to the story. While there are a couple places the band goes to in Green Room, the central story focuses on Anton Yelchin and his friends just trying to get out of the small skinhead club. This makes for plenty of claustrophobic scenes laced with paranoia and close quarters fighting. That being said, this is a very intense, gritty, and gruesome movie and Jeremy Saulnier really makes it a point not to shy away from any of the brutality. If you get sick looking at blood or absolutely abhor violence, this is certainly not the movie for you. If you’re looking for that grindhouse thrill, Green Room certainly has your back.

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This isn’t to say that Green Room is just some cheap grind house movie, because it’s so far from that. This is a very well executed, shot, and acted movie that has the balls to the wall attitude of ’70s exploitation and shock cinema. The true horror behind this movie that allows it to really stand tall and be more than just a shocking movie is the almost unbearable suspense and the down to earth characters that you’re almost certain to run into the likes of at some point. The scenes when it’s the punks against the skinheads during an escape attempt, it gets a little hard to breathe. There was a point in the movie where I realized that anything could happen to these characters and it was best to stop thinking like I knew what was going to happen next. This isn’t fleeting fear. This is fear that gets under your skin and makes you feel like you need a power shower.

One of the main reasons I was so interested in this movie was to see the great Patrick Stewart not only play a villain, but a villainous backwater neo-Nazi. Captain Picard as a Nazi. How does that not make anyone interested? It came as no surprise to see Stewart completely own his role and not go the over the top route that could have been gone. Like I said, the characters are pretty grounded in reality and that include Darcy. When Stewart first read the script, he said he really wanted the role because of how scary he found Darcy, and he does a great job with the character.

Green Room can join the ranking os one of my favorite movies of 2016 so far. There’s still a lot of movies ahead, so anything can happen, but right now I just can’t get it out of my head. This film is a brutal reminder that the world is full of heinous people, but never does it forget to be entertaining. It’s filled with an almost unbearable amount of suspense, an excellent performance by Patrick Stewart, and plenty of terrifying scenes that you can not unsee. Thank you Jeremy Saulnier and Green Room for helping breathe new life in a stale genre.

X-Men: Days of Future Past – Review

11 Jun

The X-Men franchise, which has been around for over a decade (their movies at least), is a franchise that has had some strong up and some really strong downs. Bryan Singer’s X-Men and X2: X-Men United were both triumphant examples of how a superhero movie should be made. That’s when tragedy struck. X3: X-Men United was a complete disaster that ruined everything Singer had done, X-Men Origins: Wolverine was a mediocre entry, and The Wolverine was downright boring. Only with Matthew Vaughn’s X-Men: First Class did the series seem to get its footing once again with one of the best entries of the franchise. Now, Singer’s back in the director’s chair and has created the most exciting, dramatic, and action packed entries yet, X-Men: Days of Future Past.

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The future is a bleak place for both humans and mutants. Giant robots called Sentinels have ravaged the planet killing both mutants and normal people who have the mutant gene, leaving the world completely devastated. It is revealed that the cause of this is because the mutant Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) assassinated the designer of the Sentinels, Boliver Trask (Peter Dinklage), and prompted the government to capture her and use her genes to create the murderous robots and making Trask appear as some sort of martyr for humankind. Now, the only chance of survival lies with a small group of remaining X-Men, particularly Wolverine (Hugh Jackman), whose consciousness is sent back in time by Kitty Pride (Ellen Page) to bring together the young Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and Magneto (Michael Fassbender) and find Mystique to stop her before she can carry out her assassination. Meanwhile, in the future, the Sentinels are closing in on the X-Men’s hide out, forcing the survivors to fight for their lives so Wolverine can complete his near impossible mission.

Of course, I’m leaving a lot out of that quick little plot summary because there really is so much going on in this movie, to the point that it’s almost mind boggling. Time travel movies are rarely simple, but I found that this one was not too difficult to understand, and that has a lot to do with the writing and directing. I could tell, right from the opening scene (which might be one of the most violent scenes in this entire series) that this movie was not only going to be entertaining, but it was also going to impress me. There’s so much to love in this movie from the action and drama to its strong sense of style and humor. Finally, but the end, it becomes obvious that Bryan Singer fixed everything that was ruined, at least for the most part.

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One of the most impressive parts of this movie is the cast, but I feel like that really goes without saying. When I first heard that the casts from both the original X-Men movies and First Class were going to be in the same movie that involves Sentinels and time travel, I was immediately down with the entire idea. Everyone really brings their A-game to this film as well. Hugh Jackman gives his expected performance as Wolverine, which has really been a perfect combination right from the start. Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen also give their expected performances as well, which says a lot because I’ve never seen them off their game in anything that they’ve been in. In my opinion though, the real scene stealers come from the people in the past. James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender have difficult jobs in this entry, being that both of their characters appear to be at the lowest points in their lives. McAvoy, especially, delivers his lines with such emotion and power, it’s hard not to get just a little choked up. How could I forget Evan Peters, though, and his brief role as Quicksilver? Not only was his brief role one of the most memorable parts of the movie, but it also showed Singer’s strength as a film maker.

To go off from the main story a little bit, this movie got me very curious for what’s to come with the X-Men movie franchise. The post credit scene was crazy enough, but I just mean with things that were added in the plot itself. It’s almost as if Bryan Singer was standing on the side, wiping off his hands, and proclaiming “There. I fixed it.” Not only is the story put completely back on track, but there’s finally some style that’s returned in both the writing and the directing. That being said, kudos have to be given to the screenwriter, Simon Kinberg.

X-Men: Days of Future Past is, without a doubt, the best entry in this franchise and is also a refreshingly awesome and dramatic summer blockbuster. There’s a lot to marvel at with the outstanding special effects that add a level of epicness, but the dramatic story and social critique is just as excellent. The characters aren’t stupid and neither is the story, which only makes this film all the better. If you’re looking to just be mildly entertained, watch X-Men Origins. If you want to be blown right out of your seats with pure amazement, check out Days of Future Past.