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Deadpool – Review

16 Feb

I’ve been dying to write this review for a long, long time. This is a movie that I’ve been so excited for since it was revealed that it was actually going to happen. We’ve come along way since that test footage was shown at Comic-Con. Now we have the feature length Deadpool. Deadpool is Marvel’s most beloved black sheep, so it’s no surprise that he’s getting this kind of treatment. There was a lot riding on this movie with all of the ridiculous advertising and the fact that Deadpool fans no exactly what they want, and I’m proud to say that Deadpool is the perfect movie for this character and also the most badass Marvel movie since Punisher: War Zone.

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Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is an ex-special forces operative who now makes a living selling his skills as a mercenary to the highest buyer. One night, Wade meets the person destined to be the love of his life, Vanessa Carlysle (Morena Baccarin), and the two spend many a happy night with one another. Things take a turn for the worst when Wade finds out he has cancer growing all over his body and turns to a man named Francis, aka Ajax (Ed Skrein) to undergo a highly experimental treatment that will cure his cancer and turn him superhuman. What Wade doesn’t know is how sadistic and controlling Francis is, and he is eventually horribly disfigured while also having his cancer cured and an ability to regenerate. After his betrayal at the hands of Francis, Wade assumes his new identity as Deadpool, whose mission is to find Francis and get his revenge no matter how many mutilated bodies he leaves along the way. If only he didn’t have to deal with Colossus (Stefan Kapičić) and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand).

Deadpool is a hard movie to summarize because it’s a movie that has to be seen to believe. Anyone who has ever read a comic with Deadpool or played a game with Deadpool or have watched a cartoon with Deadpool knows that he is possibly the most unconventional comic book character ever created. This left screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick and director Tim Miller a lot to work with. The possibilities to break the fourth wall, create chaos in Deadpool’s own psyche, and just have fun with complete anarchy were limitless. Luckily the film makers went all out and clearly had a blast with the material. Deadpool often times blasts into this anarchic blur of mayhem and doesn’t even let up when the end credits start to roll.

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I can’t say I was really worried that the humor and action in Deadpool weren’t going to be on par with everything else I’ve seen the character in, but there was a feeling in the pit of my stomach that caused me some concern. Luckily, I really had nothing to be concerned about. In terms of the humor, it’s vulgar and obnoxious, but also can be very smart and quick witted. Deadpool isn’t called the “merc with a mouth” for nothing, and Reynolds has plenty of great lines to spit, even if it means breaking the fourth wall and bringing meta humor to a much stranger level. As for the action, well, this certainly isn’t the next Captain America. It’s so gratifying to see people explode, get decapitated, smashed, mashed, mushed, and altogether obliterated in a Marvel movie. I couldn’t have been more pleased.

Casting Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool seems like the obvious choice, and that’s because he really was born to play this role. It’s great to finally see him get a chance to really play the character after his horrendous portrayal in X-Men Origins: Wolverine. Just the way Reynolds moves and speaks makes him the perfect choice to play the character. The supporting cast all did really well too. Kapičić and Hildebrand had some funny scenes and got to show off their own powers while Skrein and Gina Carano played villains that are fun to hate. Finally, T.J. Miller had some great dialogue scenes with Reynolds and provided a lot of great comedic relief in some of the more serious scenes.

Deadpool isn’t the most complex or narratively reward superhero film you’ll ever see, but it is the perfect movie for the Merc with a Mouth. It’s full of great humor, explosive action, and spot on acting. There was so much riding on this movie’s success with all of the ridiculous advertising and the long wait for the movie to actually come out. It’s just so nice to see a beloved character given such a perfect treatment in a movie. I loved Deadpool and I can’t wait to see it again.

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Blade Trilogy – Review

31 May

When the the company Marvel comes to mind, the first characters that come to mind are Spider Man, Iron Man, X Men, and Captain America. Those are prime examples of the Marvel universe, but we shouldn’t forget about the more minor characters, like Blade. Blade is a vampire hunter, who himself is a hybrid, who made his first appearance in the tenth issue of The Tomb of Dracula in 1973. Now, he is better known for the movie trilogy with Wesley Snipes as the title character. These are, for the most part, exciting films and a smaller, but fun part, of the larger Marvel movie collection.

Let’s start our reviews with 1998 film Blade.

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Blade (Wesley Snipes) and his partner Whistler (Kris Kristofferson) have spent their lives hunting vampires, a secret race of genetic mutants that feed on human blood. Their vampirism is described as a plague that must be wiped from the face of the earth. On one night, Blade comes across Dr. Karen Jenson (N’Bushe Wright) as she is being attacked by the vampire Quinn (Donal Logue). He saves her and learns that Quinn’s leader of sorts, Deacon Frost (Stephen Dorff) has a plan to release an ancient vampire creature, La Magra, and use this entity to destroy the human race and create a society of vampires. This won’t be so easy with Blade, Whistler, and their reluctant new partner Karen hot on his tale and with plenty of motivation to stop him.

Blade is one of those movies where you have to know exactly what it is you’re going in to see. There isn’t much character development in this movie at all and the story could have been laid out a hell of  a lot smoother, but the movie really is a lot of fun. Part of this has to do with how much enjoyment the actors seem to be having. Snipes and Kristofferson both seem really into their roles and I immediately sided with them and their cause. The real scene stealer, however, is Stephen Dorff. He not only looks the part, but really dives into the whole persona of Frost and makes it his own. I feel like you can tell when actors really love their role, and this is one of those times.

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Blade also has great action, and a lot of it. When a vampire gets killed, it disintegrates into dust and bones, which looks really cool and remains that way for the entirety of the trilogy. There’s also gallons of blood to be seen in this movie, which is good because this is a movie about vampires. The narrative construction and character development may lack in a big way, but this film is a whole lot of bloody fun that makes me wonder what happened to cool vampires like the ones I’m seeing here. There’s no sparkling to be seen. Isn’t that incentive enough?

One of my favorite film makers, Guillermo Del Toro, would go on to make Blade II in 2002. This was a huge step forward for not only the series, but also for special effects and costume design.

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It seems like the last thing Blade would want to do ever is join forces with vampires. Well, unfortunately for him, that is exactly what he has to do. The vampire and human races are in danger when a new breed of vampire surfaces that feeds on both. These “reapers” pass on the virus to other vampires when they are fed on. Blade and Whistler, and their new partner Scud (Norman Reedus) are commissioned by the vampire overlord Eli Damaskinos (Thomas Kretschmann) to join a team of vampires called the Bloodpack to go out and hunt these reapers and take them all down, especially their leader and origin of the virus, Jared Nomak (Luke Goss). The Bloodpack was originally formed to hunt and kill Blade, so tensions are pushed which makes for a dangerous time for everyone involved, perhaps even more dangerous than the reapers.

I absolutely love everything about Blade II. This is one of the most fun action movies I have ever seen and it is shot so well. The story is an improvement from the first in terms of character development and complexity, but that’s only the beginning. The special effects and make up all look really fantastic. There are times when fights seamlessly become computer generated to show us angles and action that we otherwise would not have been able to see. The make up for the reapers also look outstanding, and appropriately fit in with any other monster in Del Toro’s films.

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Blade II continues the story and builds the universe of this trilogy very well and basically improves on the original in every way. Some of the make up seems to have inspired the creature design in the later Underworld films and the special effects add a new layer of awesomeness to the entire thing. The only thing that isn’t as good is the villain, but Dorff’s Deacon Frost is a tough act to follow. Blade II is a blast of a movie that shouldn’t be missed out on. It’s the most fun I’ve had with a movie in a long time.

Finally, the trilogy comes to a close with the 2004 film Blade: Trinity.

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A group of vampires led by Danica Talos (Parker Posley) finds a ziggurat tomb in the Syrian desert that is the resting place of Drake Dominic Purcell, better known as Dracula. Meanwhile, Blade is having a hard time with the FBI since they caught on to what he was doing, but believes he is a sociopath killing human beings. While dodging the FBI and other officers, Blade has to team up with vampire hunters Hannibal King (Ryan Reynolds) and Whistler’s daughter Abigail (Jessica Biel) in order to take down Dracula, who might be his greatest adversary yet.

What can I say about Blade: Trinity? Simply stating that it’s the weakest entry in the series would be an understatement. Not only is it the weakest entry in the trilogy, it’s a pretty dumb movie all together. This is hardly even a Blade movie since the film makers seem to be interested in his co-starts than they are about Blade, himself. Jessica Biel doesn’t really do anything of interest in the movie except look nice and Ryan Reynolds… ugh Ryan Reynolds. I have nothing against the guy as an actor, but his performance in Blade: Trinity was almost too much to handle. David S. Goyer, who wrote all three Blade films and directed this one, obviously forgot what the concept of comic relief really meant. Every snarky line of dialogue that Reynolds says feels out of placed, forced, and not funny.

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The action sequences are also really unremarkable and edited in a way that makes them feel slow and repetitive. The other Blade movies had editing which really made the viewer feel like they were in the middle of a hectic situation, and the fights in Blade II were choreographed by Donnie Yen, which is a plus there. In this film, they’re sloppy and slow. I can hardly call this a Blade movie. Even Wesley Snipes had major problems with it and stayed away from Goyer for most of the shoot. Bottom line, it doesn’t bring anything new or exciting, nor does it uphold what made the other movies so good. It’s a huge disappointment and I would recommend you stay away from this.

This trilogy is pretty cool for the most part. The original Blade is a welcoming start to the trilogy with a villain that steals the show. Blade II is one of the better action movies I have ever seen and I’m very excited to watch it again. Blade: Trinity is a stupid mess of a movie that I could have gone my entire life without seeing and been a better person for it. Two out of three movies aren’t bad and the first two shouldn’t be missed. Even though Marvel only produced the last film, Blade is still a Marvel character, making these pretty interesting pieces to the Marvel universe. If you ever find yourself in need of a break from Tony Stark, check out the Blade Trilogy, well… at least the first two.