Tag Archives: scarlett johannson

Her – Review

3 Feb

What do you think people would say 50 or 60 years ago if you were to tell them that in the future we would be talking and dating people we met on a crazy invention called the internet? Wouldn’t be even stranger to try to explain that sometimes people don’t even each other before they begin a relationship? We have entered a crazy time in social networking and relationships, where our connectivity is almost crucial to our friends and significant others. Her not only explores this in a way that doesn’t seem like it’s been said a hundred and ten times, and it also provided a more than worthy love story that may arguably be the best since Woody Allen’s Annie Hall.

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Theodore Twombly (Joaquin Phoenix) is a sad and lonely man who works for a company that writes personal letters for other people. Theodore has been avoiding signing the divorce papers from his wife and childhood friend Catherine (Rooney Mara), and as a result has become introverted and uninterested in any kinds of relationships, including rarely seeing his good friend Amy (Amy Adams). One day, Theodore purchases an OS (Scarlett Johansson), or Operating System, that he customizes to have a female voice, and when he learns that this computer is able to think for itself and have an identity the two become friends. The OS names herself Samantha, and her and Theodore begin a romantic relationship. Life seems to finally be going well for him until it becomes apparent that Samantha is learning and evolving in a much faster rate than can ever have been expected.

While Spike Jonze doesn’t have a particularly long filmography, you can’t argue that it isn’t impressive. Films like Adaptation and Being John Malkovich have proven that he is an exceptional film maker, and his background in music videos also shows that he has a good visual style. Now with Her, he shows that he has major talent in the writing department. Jonze deftly mixes his absurdist humor with some real, down to earth human drama. That might sound kind of odd considering what this movie is about and how crazy the storyline is, but I feel like a lot of people could connect with the characters in this movie.

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It really says a lot about the actors in this movie how they are able to build such a great relationship, even when they don’t see each other face to face and don’t even touch in any sort of way. Joaquin Phoenix handles the arc of his character very well and Scarlett Johansson, who only provides her voice for the film, does a great job at making a computer as lovable as the HAL 9000 was feared. Amy Adams also does a good job as Theodore’s documentary film making, hipster friend who plays on the cliches of that demographic in a very funny way. As good as the actors all are, if it wasn’t for Spike Jonze’s incredibly strange screenplay, complete with believable and human dialogue, Her wouldn’t be as great a film as it is.

Most of all, I think, is that I really like what Jonze is trying to say with this movie. It’s a pretty obvious statement on the case of relationships and friendships that have become very impersonal thanks to online social networking, where you don’t even have to be near the person to have a full blown conversation. It’s also a clever look at the future, and the kind of things that may or may not be acceptable if we keep going on the same path that we’re on. Not only is its messages something to listen to, but it was refreshing to see a love story that is different from the ones that come out all the time that pretty much seem to be following the same formula and have the same characters.

Her is a real one of a kind movie that made me so happy once it was over. This isn’t because the movie is especially hilarious and uplifting, because it’s actually a really sad experience. I was happy because it was just so well written, filmed, and acted and that it provided me with a different trip than I’m used to. It is a very absurd movie with an outlandish plot, but if you can get past that you will really appreciate everything about Her.

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Vicky Cristina Barcelona – Review

2 Oct

Woody Allen is a man of many talents and phobias, which seem to really work together to aid in the creation of some unforgettable films like Annie Hall and Bananas. More recently, Allen has abandoned the city of New York for a more European approach to his film making, with an example being Vicky Cristina Barcelona, a movie that explores a depressing view of love all the while teetering the line of comedy and drama.

Vicky (Rebecca Hall) and Cristina (Scarlett Johansson) are two Americans spending their summer in the Spanish city of Barcelona. Vicky is level headed, responsible, and engaged, while Cristina relishes in her nonconformity and spontaneous behavior. Everything is right with their world until they meet the mysterious bohemian artist, Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem), who immediately begins to swoon the two women in ways they have never been before. This triangle of romance gets more complicated when Juan Antonio’s crazed ex-wife, María Elena (Penélope Cruz) enters back into his life with some unforeseen consequences.

One of the best parts about this movie is that it’s almost like a scenic tour of the most beautiful spots in Spain. I love movies whose stories are international, because, as a viewer, you get to see many different locales. While this isn’t technically international, since it all takes place in Spain, I still got to see great spots that I’ve never seen before. It had a new feel and I didn’t feel like I was in a city that was all too familiar.

As I’ve said before, Woody Allen has done a great job at making this film feel like a comedy, but just as much a drama. Vicky Cristina Barcelona is an oxymoron, but then again so is Woody Allen. The mood that this film radiates is very light hearted, chatty, and sometimes a little silly. But if one was to dig deeper into what the movie is actually about, they might find themselves feeling a bit hopeless. There is a theme of the fallacies of love and how there really is no such thing as a perfect romance, or even a relationship where both parties will remain happy. Allen seems to be suggesting that there are better people than the one you already have.

I have really only one complaint about this movie, and it can pretty much be said for any Woody Allen movie. Vicky Cristina Barcelona is full of what I like to call  “Woodyisms.” John, what’s a Woodyism? Let me explain. A Woodyism is a very strange, almost impossible line of dialogue that just feels really weird. The use of the term “making love” is thrown around like crazy in this movie when a much simpler word might have sufficed, and there are plenty of words to choose from. But, as I said, this is part of the odd style of Woody Allen that I really can’t get used to.

 

Vicky Cristina Barcelona is an above average comedy/drama because of the unorthodox storytelling and the characters that really are full of life and dimensions. It’s been established for many years that Woody is a powerful force in the film industry, despite his personality and appearance. While this may not be as memorable as Annie Hall, but it still is a very strong movie that I enjoyed from beginning to end. If you’re a fan of the trademark depressing humor that this film maker has perfected, I’d say give Vicky Cristina Barcelona a watch.

The Avengers – Review

4 May

One of the first thoughts I had after leaving The Avengers last night was, “How can I review this film and still give it justice?” I’ve been training for this movie since I was a kid by watching the television shows, playing the games, and reading the books of the various characters in this film. I have so much to say, and worried that I’m just going to start rambling about how awesome it is. I’ll give it my best shot, so forgive me if I sound like a giddy school girl.

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Loki (Tom Hiddleston) is back with a vengeance in The Avengers, with plans to take over the world using the energy of the mysterious and ominous Tesseract.  Now, the director of S.H.I.EL.D, Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) assembles his team of extraordinary individuals. These are: the millionaire playboy Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.); the demigod Thor (Chris Hemsworth); the super soldier Steven Rogers/Captain America (Chris Evans); gamma radiated scientist Bruce Banner/Hulk (Mark Ruffalo); sharp shooter Clint Barton/Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner); and super agent Natasha Romanoff/Black Widow (Scarlett Johannson). Together they are The Avengers, and Loki is in for one hell of a battle for Earth.

The outstanding thing about this movie is that every superhero gets their share of screen time. One isn’t more important than the other, and every single one plays a vital role in accomplishing the mission. Even Hawkeye and Black Widow, who didn’t get their own individual tie-ins get a lot of screen time and are just as significant as characters like Thor and Captain America. I can even say that each hero got their own moment of just jaw-dropping awesomeness that my friends and I are still talking about.

I was a little worried that this movie was going to feel like it went on for too long with a run time of almost two and a half hours, especially since I was at the midnight movie and I had a small inkling of concern that I was going to fall asleep. I had absolutely no cause for concern. First of all, the movie felt like an hour and a half tops. The fact that I was in that theatre for two and a half hours is mind blowing. I just did not want the movie to end. Also, when the film first started, I immediately was wide awake and ready to go.

The special effects here are absolutely phenomenal. New York City is almost annihilated at the end, and it looks great. The fight scenes were also brilliantly choreographed and edited so that we got to see how each member was contributing to the battle. There was one long take in particular that travels all throughout the Manhattan battlefield to show all of the Avengers taking on numerous villains. It was so satisfying.

The performance were top notch. Tom Hiddleston is fantastically menacing as Loki, making him a villain we love to hate. Downey Jr. is appropriately sarcastic, and Chris Evans and Chris Hemsworth pull off the tough talking but heroic persona of a superhero. The scene stealer in The Avengers, however, is Mark Ruffalo, who I didn’t put enough faith into. His Bruce Banner is very mild and soft spoken, but when he Hulks out, the audience is treated to the best Hulk scenes to grace the big screen.

I know I’m going to get a lot of heat from this next statement, but I believe that The Avengers surpasses The Dark Knight. Go ahead and disagree. That’s absolutely fine, but I can honestly say I was never more entertained by the action and surprisingly deep characters of The Avengers, and it was awesome to see all these heroes onscreen at the same time. It is the best super hero movie ever made, by far, and the scene during the end credits make me very impatient for the next one. I 110% recommend The Avengers, and I can’t wait to go back to the theaters and see it again.