Tag Archives: seven psychopaths

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Review

6 Dec

Martin McDonagh is a man of many talents. For years he’s been writing plays in Europe and has received much acclaim. Not only that, but every foray he’s made into film has also been a success. In Bruges took critics and audiences by surprise and was even nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. His next film, Seven Psychopaths, didn’t get the recognition that In Bruges did, but it worked as a darkly subversive comedy that broke all the rules of narrative. Well, I’m thrilled to say that McDonagh has really outdone himself this time with what is far and away the best film he’s ever made, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. This is the kind of movie that will give you a physical response that’s similar to a bag of bricks being dropped on your stomach. As the credits rolled, I almost couldn’t move because I was just so stunned at what I just saw.

It’s been 7 months since Mildred Hayes’ (Frances McDormand) daughter was brutally murdered and the police have come no closer to solving the crime and bringing justice to the killer. After seeing three unused billboards on a small road outside of town, Mildred decides to buy the ad space and put up three signs that ask why the murderer hasn’t been caught, with much of the hostility directed to Sheriff Bill Willoughby (Woody Harrelson). These billboards spark new life in the case of Mildred’s daughter but it also reveals a much uglier side to the town of Ebbing, Missouri. The town is quickly divided between those who support the billboards and Mildred’s crusade, and others who sometimes violently oppose it, including one of Willoughby’s officers, Jason Dixon (Sam Rockwell). As tensions flare, Ebbing turns into a Cold War zone and it’s a time that will change the small town forever.

There’s so much to praise in Three Billboards that it’s hard to know where to start. What really had me overwhelmed the most was the whole concept of the film, but also how it was written. From the time the billboards are put up, tension builds quickly, and there are a few times where that tension explodes only to return with a vengeance. This film is relentless in its storytelling and barely gives the audience time to breath. Martin McDonagh is known for his ability to deftly blend dark comedy and brutally realistic drama, and this is the height of that. This movie is a lot sadder than it is funny, but there are plenty of belly laughs to have throughout the film’s narrative. When you aren’t laughing, however, McDonagh takes the dramatic side of the story and weaves it in a way I’m sort of unfamiliar with. There are few movies that really, genuinely shock me, but this one went places I never expected. This made the whole experience feel 100% fresh and new.

What really makes Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri work so wonderfully is emotional depth of the story. I’m not talking about if it makes you happy or sad or base feelings felt by the characters, but something that’s been lurking underneath the facade of the town for years. This is a story of hate exploding in an area not built to properly contain it. It’s a natural reaction felt by normal people living in a world that has become overwrought with anger and opinions mixed with violence. This is an incredibly timely film that also can be viewed as timeless. There’s no moral center in this film. No character serves as the hero. Each one is deeply flawed with thoughts that are so incredibly politically incorrect, you may find yourself with your mouth hanging open. At the end of the day, however, these are still people trying to find a comfortable place in a world that has become undone, and the town of Ebbing is just a microcosm of the bigger picture.

Now that I got all deep there, let’s talk about something more plain to see. Frances McDormand gives one of the best performances of her career that rivals her role in Fargo. She brash and mean but also sad and incredibly vulnerable. Equally fantastic is Woody Harrelson who has one of the most complex roles in the entire movie. I have to give a major shout out to Sam Rockwell, who continues to be one of my absolute favorite actors in the business. Give him any role, and I bet you he can nail it. This is all award caliber stuff here, folks, so keep your eyes peeled when the time comes. Speaking of that, Lucas Hedges returns after his work in Manchester by the Sea with a sort of similar role, but he still manages to knock it out of the park.

We’ve had a lot of great films this year. I always saw Wind River as my favorite with films like Dunkirk and Killing of a Sacred Deer coming in close behind. They still remain high on the list, but I don’t see how anything can beat Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. This film is a genreless masterpiece that defies what you may come to expect and the physical reaction it left me with is one of a kind. Martin McDonagh has given us the best piece of his film making career and it’s something that has been firmly on my mind since the day I saw it. Whatever you do, do NOT miss out on this movie.

Final Grade: A+

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Seven Psychopaths – Review

23 Nov

In 2008, writer and director Martin McDonagh graced the world with one of the most original and hilarious dark comedies ever to be produced, In Bruges. The movie was nominated for an Academy Award for its writing, and rightly so. The question was: Could McDonagh’s next movie support itself under the weight of In Bruges? The answer to that question came in 2012 with Seven Psychopaths. I’m not going to say that this movie surpasses or comes to close to the material that he struck gold with before, but it is a worthy and still darkly hilarious piece of work that’s jam packed with gallows humor, in jokes, and violence. How could I not like this movie?

Seven-Psychopaths-Poster

Marty Farnanan (Colin Farrell) is a struggling screenwriter and full time alcoholic who can’t seem to get any inspiration for his newest screenplay titled Seven Psychopaths. His best friend Billy Bickle (Sam Rockwell), who runs dog-napping operation, thinks he can help by placing an ad in the newspaper, asking “psychopaths” to contact Marty and tell him their stories. Meanwhile, Billy and his partner Hans (Christopher Walken) end up biting off more than they can chew when they dognap a Shih Tzu that belongs to the notoriously violent criminal, Charlie Costello (Woody Harrelson), who begins gunning down anyone who gets in the way of him retrieving his precious puppy. Marty, Billy, and Hans have to team up to protect themselves from Charlie’s rampage, while possibly getting some inspiration for Marty’s screenplay.

At its core, Seven Psychopaths succeeds at taking the cliches of the action/crime genre, and totally flipping the conventions on their heads while at the same time honoring them as timely traditions. The line that really hammers this home is when Billy points out that an area they are driving by is the “perfect place for the final shootout.” It’s no surprise that this area comes back again at a pivotal point of the film. Now, calling this film “meta” wouldn’t be completely accurate, but it kinda sorta is. Billy is just such a fascinating character because he’s the only person in the movie that seems to be in on the joke, almost as if he’s aware that he’s just a player in someone else’s movie and he wants to follow the proper steps to the proper climactic scene. It’s a brilliant way to write a character, and may be one of the best characterizations I’ve seen in a long time.

Seven Psychopaths_shootout

 

So as hilarious as this movie is, there is still a big problem that I have with it that makes it come up short in terms of achieving the success that In Bruges did. Now, it’s pretty awesome that Tom Waits has a part in this movie. He is a legend in the music world after all and has a really hardcore following. Believe me, I know some people that can’t stop talking about him. That being said, he doesn’t need to be in this movie. It really doesn’t make sense that he is. The scene that he’s in, as smartly written as it is, is pointless and ridiculously long. His character is really of no importance to the story, so why spend so much time on him? Was it just to have him in the movie. This isn’t the only time the movie goes off an a ridiculous tangent, but it is the most overdone and pointless ones in the movie. If this scene was cut altogether, the movie probably would have felt a lot smoother than it did.

But still, this movie is a refreshing breath of noxious fumes. There’s no doubt that Seven Psychopaths is a comedy, but I’d be damned if i didn’t say this movie didn’t try to offend, and I write that with a smile on my face. The language is as cut throat as the violence is, but the way the violence and language is presented fills me with glee. It’s excessive in that way that only the most potent dark comedies are, made by people that really understand the point of gallows humor. This isn’t a tame movie in the least, and it even gets pretty dramatic at times, but the comedy is consistent in a way that the movie’s narrative is not, so at least we have loads of laughs to get us through the unnecessary scenes.

Seven Psychopaths is a riot in every sense of the word. It’s violent, kinetic, hilarious, and oddly sentimental. It’s one of those movies that pays its respects to other movies, while remaining original in just about every aspect. Think of it as a really clever inside joke that doesn’t get old. While the humor may be a bit dark for some people’s standards, it is still a well acted, well written, and well produced film. It doesn’t quite reach the level of greatness as Martin McDonagh’s first film, but it makes me excited for whatever work he releases in the future.