Tag Archives: superhero

Power Rangers – Review

30 Mar

When I was a kid, it was a joy to tune into whatever version of Power Rangers was playing. The original show, Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers, was such a touchstone in my childhood that I’ve never really outgrown it and still have fun revisiting the show when I can, no matter how silly it can be. When I saw that a big budget movie reboot was in the works, I was equally excited an nervous. It’s pretty hard to mess up something so straightforward as Power Rangers, but I believe Hollywood can ruin anything if they put their minds to it. I went and saw the new Power Rangers movie opening night, and I’m so relieved to say that while it isn’t a masterpiece, it’s still a entertaining time at the movies and a great way to reboot the concept for the big screen.

After accidentally finding mysterious crystals at the edge of a mine, five teenagers from Angel Grove are about to experience something they never thought possible. Jason (Dacre Montgomery) is a disgraced athlete whose only friends at this point is Billy (R.J. Cyler), an autistic loner who has a penchant for technology, and Kimberly (Naomi Scott), a former cheerleader who also has disgraced herself out of that particular group. These three, along with the new girl Trini (Becky G) and outcast Zack (Ludi Lin) notice how much their strength has increased since finding these crystals. Upon further investigation at the mine, they find an ancient spaceship and meet its only inhabitant, Alpha 5 (Bill Hader) who awakens the mysterious entity, Zordon (Bryan Cranston). Zordon and Alpha 5 explain to the teenagers that they are the next Power Rangers, whose task it is is to defend the planet and the Zeo Crystals from any and all threats. The newest threat is one Zordon knows very well. His arch enemy Rita Repulsa (Elizabeth Banks) has awakened after thousands of years and will use the Zeo Crystals to take over the world with her minion known as Goldar. Now the five teenagers have to work together to find their inner power and learn to understand and respect one another. Only then can they truly become the Power Rangers.

I had such high hopes for this movie, but deep down I expected it to fail completely. That’s why I still can’t believe how much I enjoyed it. First off, the new group of teenagers are great, and the decision to make them outcasts rather than the perfect role models was a good choice for a modern update. The first act of the movie really establishes their personalities and dynamics with one another while also giving you brief glimpses into their lives which are then elaborated on in a moving scene towards the middle of the movie. A moving scene? In a Power Rangers movie? Who would have guessed it? The whole idea of them learning to trust and understand each other in order to morph fits in well with the show, but I can see people getting off put by this difference. We also get really solid performances by all of them, with the stand out being R.J. Cyler as Billy.

Where Power Rangers starts to get lost is in the second act of the movie. Without spoiling anything, this is where the real meat and bones of the story happens, and while there’s a lot to fit in, the whole thing starts to really drag out. This is where Alpha-5, Zordon, and Rita are introduced, which is all really cool, but that happens towards the beginning of the second act. The rest of this it is all character building, which is necessary, but there were scenes where I thought the whole thing could have been cut completely. There’s one weird decision that was sort of the straw that broke the camel’s back. Something happens that feels really forced and long winded that made me start to get really antsy. I knew that the suits would be saved for the finale, but it was at this point that I just wanted the story to move along since certain plot points finally ran out of steam. Instead of moving on, however, things just kept on going.

Once the third act hits, however, it gets awesome. This is one the Rangers finally get suited up for the big showdown and it’s so much fun. The Zords all look awesome, and while some of the CGI gets a little wonky, it has this gleeful over the top element about it that is impossible to resist. It also helps that the movie took so much time to give the team distinct personalities and backstories to make me feel invested in their efforts. There were parts towards the end where I was actually on the edge of my seat, desperate to see the Power Rangers win. It’s something I can remember feeling as a kid and it was really exciting to feel it again. I just wish that it lasted a little bit longer, because I was really enjoying the spectacle. If some of the unnecessary scenes in the middle of the movie were trimmed down or cut, and the finale made longer, I would have been a very happy camper.

I really can’t believe I’m saying this, but Power Rangers is actually a good movie. It’s by no means a masterpiece, but it’s a fun, nostalgic hit of adrenaline and it succeeded in modernizing the lore and turning it into a big budget action extravaganza. The pacing of the movie can be a little weird, and there are some plot holes and inconsistencies that you may notice if you look hard enough. Even with that, the characters are great and everyone seems to be giving their all. We live in a world where the new Power Rangers movie is better than a movie called Batman v. Superman.

Final Grade: B

Logan – Review

6 Mar

The X-Men series of movies seems to have been around forever. The beloved team of mutant heroes were shown onscreen in live action for the first time back in 2000, and there are a few of these actors that are still playing the same roles almost two decades later. In this case, I’m talking about Hugh Jackman as Wolverine/Logan and Patrick Stewart as Charles Xavier/Professor X. Now, here in 2017, we’re seeing the departure of these two actors from their respective roles in the newest film of this series, Logan. What a movie to go out on. This isn’t just the best X-Men film to date, it may very well reign supreme as the best superhero film ever made.

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In the not so distant future, mutants are on the brink of extinction and have to go into hiding to avoid certain death squads and other forces that want them gone. One of these mutants is a much older Logan (Hugh Jackman) who is working as a limo driver to support his vices while also supporting a sickly Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart). A chance encounter with a nurse ends with a little girl, Laura (Dafne Keen), being left with Logan and Charles who are tasked with transporting Laura to a safe haven for mutants. Laura is soon revealed as a mutant test subject known as X-23, who is on the run from the company’s head of security, Donald Pierce (Boyd Holbrook), and his soldiers called the Reavers. Against Logan’s best wishes and attempts to rid himself of the responsibility, he takes both Laura and Charles out of their compound and begin their journey to the haven with Donald and his men hot on their tails.

There’s so much about this movie I want to dive right into that I have to force myself to stay focused. Let’s talk story first. I tried to keep my summary as vague as possible because there are so many layers and feelings that start to peel away as the movie goes on. It would be impossible to try and cover everything that is important in this movie because there isn’t one frame that is unnecessary. The story to Logan isn’t like any other X-Men movie, and it plays out like a very intense character drama as much as it is a graphically violent action film. The main reason this movie worked so well for me is because of how deep the story is and how it explored parts of these characters that were never seen before. The story is about Logan and Charles protecting X-23, but it’s also a story of family, regret, and severe, relentless pain. It’s can be a rough one at times, but I commend writer/director James Mangold and his co-writers for going there.

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The decision to make Logan rated R was a very smart move from 20th Century Fox, especially after the over the top success of Deadpool. This works great for the drama that I’ve already talked about as well as the action sequences. Let’s talk action, now. This is still a superhero movie, and a superhero movie completely devoid of action would be weird. Wolverine has always been viewed as an angry character prone to violent outbursts, and we’ve seen that in previous X-Men movies, but never like what I’ve just witnessed in Logan. This is Wolverine at his most unhinged. Limbs fly, heads roll, and the scenery is often times showered with pieces of whoever got in Logan’s way. What’s cool about it, also, is that it isn’t violence for the sake of violence. There’s a fair amount of action sequences that go heavy on the violence, but it has weight backing it up, and it never gets to a level that’s solely exploitive and gratuitous. It’s very well handled and was never anything less than exciting.

Finally, Logan has an excellent cast of characters and actors who play them to perfection. Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart have been playing these parts for years, so it’s pretty clear that they have their roles completely covered. Stewart gives a subtle and often sad performance here, where we see Professor X in ways that I’ve never thought I would. As for Hugh Jackman, this is simply his best performance. It’s controlled while also being ferocious, but the quieter and more contemplative scenes is where Jackman really shines by making Logan so vulnerable and appear so broken. There’s also some great newcomers to the series that are memorable. Dafne Keen, despite her relatively young age, is outstanding as X-23 and can really hold her own in terms of the ferociousness that is expected from the character. I also really enjoyed Boyd Holbrook’s portrayal of Donald Pierce, whose villainy oozed through every scene he was in. It’s exactly how I like my comic book bad guys.

I really wasn’t a fan of X-Men Origins or The Wolverine so I was really hoping that Logan was going to do the character right. Well, it sure does and it does even better than I could have hoped. It’s sad to see Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart bowing out of their roles, but this was the send off that they deserved. This is a powerful film that has some really heavy storytelling that will leave you teary eyed yet incredibly satisfied. This is the best written and executed entry of all the X-Men films and it brings something new and exciting to the superhero genre that can potentially change the game. I absolutely loved Logan.

Final Grade: A+

Darkman Trilogy – Review

4 Sep

The super hero genre is more alive than ever before nowadays, and that’s both good and bad. It’s good because most of them are very entertaining, and bad because it’s flooding the market. A name that goes hand in hand with super hero films in my opinion is Sam Raimi. Raimi successfully brought the webslinger to life in Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2 (not so much Spider-Man 3). Before any of this, however, Raimi created a character named Darkman, a dark super hero based on characters like Batman and The Shadow, but also inspired by the old Universal monster movies. This idea spawned a trilogy of movies called the Darkman Trilogy. While two of these movies are direct-to-video with differing qualities, it can’t be denied the first film has become a cult classic.

Let’s start in 1990 with the original film, Darkman.

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Peyton Westlake (Liam Neeson) is a brilliant, but completely underfunded scientist who is on the verge of developing a new synthetic skin. Even with the hidden variables making this project difficult, Peyton still has the support and love of his long time girlfriend Julie (Frances McDormand). Julie is a district attorney who is close to uncovering illegal business dealings by a major developer named Louis Strack (Colin Friels). Another party is interested in this incriminating evidence, a violent gangster named Robert Durant (Larry Drake). Durant breaks into Westlake’s lab to look for the evidence, and in the process destroys his work and severely burns and disfigures Westlake. Now thought to be dead, Peyton hides himself in a condemned factory where he rebuilds his machines that can construct any face he needs to disguise himself with, and soon begins to take revenge on Durant and his henchmen as the face changing vigilante Darkman.

Since it was first released in 1990, Darkman has become something of a cult classic. It’s over the top style and direct influences from Universal monster movies of the 1930s mixed with dark superhero action is a fantastic combination. In many ways, Sam Raimi hit the mark with Darkman, and in some ways it doesn’t quite stick. Where the movie slips up is the pacing of the story. This is an origin story, and origin stories can be tricky, especially when they aren’t based off of any real established lore. The character of Darkman came right from the head of Sam Raimi into the form a short story, so the film makers had to create a way to start the tale of Darkman. The first half hour of this movie goes frightfully quick, and it didn’t give me a chance to really care about the characters or their situations before Peyton’s transformation happens. The rest of the film goes on pretty good, with some odd speed bumps along the way, but the ridiculously fast pace of the beginning makes the character development suffer.

The movie really gets good whenever the action picks up or Sam Raimi does what he does best and goes crazy with the camera and the stylistic editing. This is a really cool movie to look at with the camera jumping all over the place and colors really popping in certain scenes. Raimi also knows how to direct action with his use of outstanding practical effects, stop motion, and blue screen to create a unique looking movie that only early-90s movies could do. Neeson also gives a pretty expressive performance as Peyton/Darkman, and it’s equally impressive given the huge amount of makeup and bandages on his face throughout most of the movie.

Darkman is a really cool, yet minor movie in the superhero genre. It’s not going to be a classic like Raimi’s later Spider-Man entries (excluding the third), but it does have a following of people that will defend it to their last breaths. While I definitely enjoyed the movie, the flaws that crop up throughout the film are very noticeable, and it’s clear that the production of this movie was pretty bumpy. Still for fans of oddball filmmaking and dark superhero tales, Darkman is a movie that deserves another look.

In 1995, Universal Studios released their first ever live action direct-to-video movie. That honor(?) goes to Darkman II: The Return of Durant.

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Years after being horribly burned and disfigured, Peyton Westlake (now played by Arnold Vosloo) still dons the title of Darkman and is still working hard to perfect his formula for synthetic skin and make it last longer than 99 minutes. What Westlake doesn’t know is that while he’s been working, Durant (again played by Larry Drake) has been alive in a coma, and he has just recently gotten out of it with plans to take over the city’s crime scene using a new super weapon designed by a mad scientist named Hathaway (Lawrence Dane). After Durant is responsible for killing the one man that may have had the secret to the synthetic skin problem, Darkman once again begins a mission of revenge against the sadistic crime lord, and this time he means to end things once and for all.

Whenever something’s released direct-to-video, I have some measure of fear that I’m about to watch a really awful movie and throw an hour and a half of my life out the window. That being said, Darkman II: The Return of Durant certainly feels like a direct-to-video movie, but it also was still a pretty entertaining film. Let’s get the garbage out of the way first. For one thing, Durant’s plan of using a super weapon designed with plutonium is way out of left field. His main goal is for a group of gun happy vigilantes to get rid of the competition so Durant will reign supreme. What? There’s so many plot holes there that it hurts to think about. The side characters in this movie are also completely useless and almost don’t even need to be in the movie at all. Most of them are just a testament to awful B-grade acting. Of course the cheesy screenplay adds a lot to that, as their characters and dialogue weren’t written well in the first place.

That being said, Darkman II is not a complete waste of time, in fact it felt like a pretty good sequel in terms of style and action. It still has this pulpy kind of fun that relishes at being way over the top. Believe it or not, I think Arnold Vosloo is a great replacement for Liam Neeson. Unfortunately, his performance is a little stifled by make up that doesn’t quite match the make up done on Neeson in the original. The only returning member from the first film is Larry Drake as Durant, and he hasn’t missed a beat in his performance. It’s still fun and easy to hate his character and he gives Darkman a villain worth defeating.

While this is definitely a step down from the original, Darkman II: The Return of Durant is not an awful movie. In fact, it’s a pretty entertaining movie that kept me watching for it’s entire run time. There are some really ridiculous plot holes and the acting is less than acceptable, but it’s B-grade minor entertainment that would be interesting to see for fans of the first Darkman. Just don’t expect anything great.

One thing these movies didn’t need was a third entry, but alas, we now have a trilogy. In 1996, the third film was released direct-to-video titled Darkman III: Die Darkman Die.

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Still trying to find the secret to permanent synthetic skin, Peyton Westlake accepts to offer of Dr. Bridget Thorne’ (Darlanne Fluegel) help to not only fix his destroyed nerve endings, but also allow him to use her laboratory. During his time there, Westlake finds the secret, but is betrayed by Thorne, who is actually working for a crime lord named Rooker (Jeff Jahey). Rooker wants to extract whatever it is that makes Westlake so strong, so that he can synthesize it and inject it into his henchmen. These super soldiers of Rooker’s will then go on to assassinate the district attorney and give Rooker unlimited power over the city. Feeling vengeful towards both Thorne and Rooker, and feeling an overwhelming desire to protect Rooker’s innocent family, Westlake becomes Darkman again to now save the city, a task more important than saving himself.

So here we have the second direct-to-video release of this trilogy, and boy have we really gone downhill. Darkman II: The Return of Durant was a pretty ok, pretty standard B-movie that had some problems, but was ultimately entertaining. Darkman III: Die Darkman Die is a complete train wreck of a movie. There is such little action, hardly any humor, and a story that is so boring and out of place that I lost interest before the halfway mark was even close to hitting. The whole plot of Rooker not spending enough time with his family, and Westlake disguising himself to take care of them is so stupid I almost can’t even handle it. There’s so much bland family drama with cringe worthy lines said by a terrible child actor that I was almost embarrassed watching it. How can a cool superhero action movie turn into this?

Arnold Vosloo is back playing Peyton Westlake/Darkman and he’s still a good substitution for Liam Neeson, but his role is written really poorly in this entry. He’s either grunting with pain, screaming with anger, or being overly sentimental with Rooker’s family. Darkman’s entire story of trying to fix his skin is also too played out by this point and the amount of stock footage from the second film just goes to show how repetitive this whole movie feels. The only positive I can think of is Jeff Fahey’s performance as Rooker. He’s an over the top, smug villain with a face that you just wanna hit. He seems to be having a good time oozing evil, so the entertainment I did have with this movie came from him.

Darkman III: Die Darkman Die is an insult to the first film and a disappointment to its ok sequel. It walks a fine line of being way too familiar while also straying uncomfortably far from the source material. The story could have easily ended after the second film, which makes this third movie feel like someone just thumbtacked it on to the canon that was already present. Do yourself a favor and do something better with your time. Spend an hour and a half tying and untying your shoes. It’s more fun than watching this mess.

So there you have it. The Darkman Trilogy is a pretty uneven group of movies. Nevertheless, the first film is a super cool dark super hero film and the sequel really isn’t all that bad considering the casting changes and its direct-to-video status. The only one to stay away from is the third film. Stay far away from that. If you haven’t exposed yourself to the dark anti-hero that is Darkman, I suggest you give it a try.

Captain America: Civil War – Review

10 May

The Marvel Cinematic Universe has turned into one of the biggest franchises of all time, and it just keeps on growing with new shows and movies coming out all of the time. Some people are down right sick of it all, but I welcome any and all new comers as long as they’re made well and are still entertaining. The last film released in the MCU was Ant-Man, a relatively minor movie but still a whole lot of fun. Now with Captain America: Civil War, we’re back to the epic scale and cast of characters we haven’t seen the likes of since Avengers: Age of Ultron. To put it simply, Civil War might just be the best Marvel movie to date for the action, the story, and the character development.

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After the incident in Sokovia and a more recent incident in Lagos, both of which resulted in the deaths of innocent people, the governments of the world have decided that it’s time to put the Avengers in check. Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey, Jr.) comes to Steve Rogers/Captain America (Chris Evans) with a UN agreement that places the Avengers under the control of a government panel, which will be responsible for where and when the group of superhumans would be put into action. This doesn’t bode well with Steve, but after his long lost friend Bucky/Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) is seen assassinating a government official, Steve has to decide to become a fugitive to help his friend. This causes a great divide between the Avengers which leads to a showdown for the ages.

This is a pretty hard movie to summarize in just one paragraph because there is so much that happens, but it’s all told in a manner that flows nicely and never becomes boring. While the movie is a sequel to Captain America: The Winter Soldier, it also acts as a sequel for Age of Ultron while also setting up characters like Black Panther and Spider-Man, both of whom I will get to later. I don’t want to distract myself here, but I can’t help thinking that this is what Batman v Superman was supposed to be. This is a film that has a core premise that it never strays away from while also introducing new things to this constantly growing and changing universe. It makes me excited to talk more about Civil War, but also what’s to come.

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The directors of this film, Anthony and Joe Russo, were also the film makers behind The Winter Soldier, which finally gave ol’ Cap the treatment that he deserved. It was an excellent film and they were really the obvious choices to continue the story with Civil War. They bring a sense of reality to the superhero genre that people have tried to do and not succeeded. It isn’t as real world as something like Christopher Nolan’s Batman movies, but the things that happen in this film are done in such a way that I could almost picture it happening in real life. I know that must sound absolutely absurd since this is a superhero film, and I agree it is absurd. Isn’t that the job of movies though? To take the viewer and make them believe what they’re seeing. The Russo brothers do an excellent job at making this film, for all of its bombastic set pieces, have a grounding in the real world where there are consequences for your actions and a large gray area between right and wrong.

Every hero in this movie gets their own time to shine, and that’s pretty important when the cast is this huge. Captain America, the Winter Soldier, and Iron Man are at the forefront and clash well both with words and violence. We all know that these actors were made for these parts, so I don’t even need to get into it. The real scene stealers were Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), Spider-Man (Tom Holland), and Ant-Man (Paul Rudd). These three heroes are the newest editions to this universe so it was important that they got time to show off what they can really do. Black Panther kicks an outrageous amount of ass, Tom Holland’s Spider-Man is the best I’ve seen yet, and Ant-Man is just a ridiculous amount of fun.

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Captain America: Civil War is the most important of the Marvel films to date, in terms of the overall story, and it’s also one of, if not the most well made of all the movies. Anthony and Joe Russo are excellent blockbuster film makers, and the cast all help create characters we can stand behind. If super hero movies keep up this level of entertainment, then they can just keep on coming. This is not only my favorite Captain America movie, but also my favorite movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Deadpool – Review

16 Feb

I’ve been dying to write this review for a long, long time. This is a movie that I’ve been so excited for since it was revealed that it was actually going to happen. We’ve come along way since that test footage was shown at Comic-Con. Now we have the feature length Deadpool. Deadpool is Marvel’s most beloved black sheep, so it’s no surprise that he’s getting this kind of treatment. There was a lot riding on this movie with all of the ridiculous advertising and the fact that Deadpool fans no exactly what they want, and I’m proud to say that Deadpool is the perfect movie for this character and also the most badass Marvel movie since Punisher: War Zone.

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Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) is an ex-special forces operative who now makes a living selling his skills as a mercenary to the highest buyer. One night, Wade meets the person destined to be the love of his life, Vanessa Carlysle (Morena Baccarin), and the two spend many a happy night with one another. Things take a turn for the worst when Wade finds out he has cancer growing all over his body and turns to a man named Francis, aka Ajax (Ed Skrein) to undergo a highly experimental treatment that will cure his cancer and turn him superhuman. What Wade doesn’t know is how sadistic and controlling Francis is, and he is eventually horribly disfigured while also having his cancer cured and an ability to regenerate. After his betrayal at the hands of Francis, Wade assumes his new identity as Deadpool, whose mission is to find Francis and get his revenge no matter how many mutilated bodies he leaves along the way. If only he didn’t have to deal with Colossus (Stefan Kapičić) and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand).

Deadpool is a hard movie to summarize because it’s a movie that has to be seen to believe. Anyone who has ever read a comic with Deadpool or played a game with Deadpool or have watched a cartoon with Deadpool knows that he is possibly the most unconventional comic book character ever created. This left screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick and director Tim Miller a lot to work with. The possibilities to break the fourth wall, create chaos in Deadpool’s own psyche, and just have fun with complete anarchy were limitless. Luckily the film makers went all out and clearly had a blast with the material. Deadpool often times blasts into this anarchic blur of mayhem and doesn’t even let up when the end credits start to roll.

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I can’t say I was really worried that the humor and action in Deadpool weren’t going to be on par with everything else I’ve seen the character in, but there was a feeling in the pit of my stomach that caused me some concern. Luckily, I really had nothing to be concerned about. In terms of the humor, it’s vulgar and obnoxious, but also can be very smart and quick witted. Deadpool isn’t called the “merc with a mouth” for nothing, and Reynolds has plenty of great lines to spit, even if it means breaking the fourth wall and bringing meta humor to a much stranger level. As for the action, well, this certainly isn’t the next Captain America. It’s so gratifying to see people explode, get decapitated, smashed, mashed, mushed, and altogether obliterated in a Marvel movie. I couldn’t have been more pleased.

Casting Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool seems like the obvious choice, and that’s because he really was born to play this role. It’s great to finally see him get a chance to really play the character after his horrendous portrayal in X-Men Origins: Wolverine. Just the way Reynolds moves and speaks makes him the perfect choice to play the character. The supporting cast all did really well too. Kapičić and Hildebrand had some funny scenes and got to show off their own powers while Skrein and Gina Carano played villains that are fun to hate. Finally, T.J. Miller had some great dialogue scenes with Reynolds and provided a lot of great comedic relief in some of the more serious scenes.

Deadpool isn’t the most complex or narratively reward superhero film you’ll ever see, but it is the perfect movie for the Merc with a Mouth. It’s full of great humor, explosive action, and spot on acting. There was so much riding on this movie’s success with all of the ridiculous advertising and the long wait for the movie to actually come out. It’s just so nice to see a beloved character given such a perfect treatment in a movie. I loved Deadpool and I can’t wait to see it again.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier – Review

7 Apr

Captain America has been my favorite Avenger since, well, ever. His portrayal has been spot on in Captain America: The First Avenger and The Avengers, but I never really felt that they were using Cap in the ways that they could have been using him. The action scenes in The First Avenger felt chopped up and he didn’t have a whole lot to do in The Avengers, but that is no longer the case with Captain America: The Winter Soldier. This takes the universe that these Marvel movies have created and shakes it up in a way that hasn’t been seen yet, and makes me wonder what’s going to happen next for these heroes. It also happens to be my favorite stand alone Marvel movie yet.

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Now living in modern times, Captain America, aka Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is having a hard time adjusting to the culture, but may be having a harder time dealing with the ideologies and working of S.H.I.E.L.D. After a mission concerning hostages, Rogers begins to get suspicious of both Black Widow/Natasha Romanoff (Scarlet Johansson) and Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). Matters are made worse when a mysterious and deadly attack is made on S.H.E.I.L.D by the mysterious Winter Soldier, who is only the start of a much bigger plan concerning the collapse of the entire organization. Captain America, along with Black Widow and his newfound friend Sam Wilson/Falcon (Anthony Mackie), begins to fight their own war in Washington D.C, but their actions and the actions of their enemies may just destroy everything that they have been working for.

Out of every outing that a single Marvel hero has had, this is definitely the best one with the original Iron Man following close behind. This was everything that a Captain America movie should be and it was great to finally get to see him really kick ass. Words can’t describe how satisfying the noise is when he whacks or throws his shield at someone. Not only did the Captain have more to do, but so did Black Widow and Nick Fury. The addition of Falcon was also great, providing some awesome aerial action scenes. This was almost like a mini Avengers movie, and it definitely had the scale of one with things falling out of the sky, car chases throughout Washington, and reveals that will shake the core of the Marvel universe.

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The action in The Winter Soldier is really turned up from the first Captain America movie. I understand that the first one was an origin story and it was important to explain how Steve Rogers became Captain America, but like I said before, he’s my favorite Avenger and I’ve been really waiting to see just what he can do. I was disappointed at first with this movie because the first action sequence used that god awful shaky action cam. I didn’t want to stop watching but it was making me sick to my stomach, and I was worried that that was how the rest of the action sequences were going to be filmed. Luckily, I didn’t have a problem with any of the other ones. This movie is full of awesome action with some of the best special effects in a superhero movie that I’ve seen yet. At a point the action almost becomes non-stop, and I absolutely loved it.

This is really a movie that needs to be made at this point in time. The whole time, I felt like the story could be almost like a 1970s spy film, because of the themes of the government watching your every move. That being said, we are back in a time where that is a cause for concern, and I loved how this movie touched on that. There are times where Cap is saying that it isn’t freedom if we have a government looming over us and threatening us with violence as a way to keep the peace. We haven’t really moved forward in that department when it comes to freedom, and this was an interesting way to go about exploring that idea, through a superhero movie.

Captain America: The Winter Soldier not only shows how a Captain America movie should be made, but how an action packed Hollywood blockbuster should be made. There’s plenty of witty banter, action set pieces, and things blowing up but that doesn’t compromise the intelligence of the movie. That’s one of the best thing about these Marvel films: they’re never stupid. This is an excellent edition to the growing list of films in this superhero universe, and it made me even more excited for The Avenger: Age of Ultron.

Iron Man 3 – Review

8 May

It’s so nice to see old friends again, granted the old friends I’m talking about are characters in a Marvel movie. But you know what, I don’t think that’s so weird. Through all the Iron Man films, I’ve grown really attached to Tony, Pepper, James, and even Jarvis. Here they are again, all returning for the highly anticipated Iron Man 3, the kick starter of the summer movie season. If this movie is any indication of what the summer’s going to be like, then it’s gonna be great overall, with a very punishing disappointment…

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Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) hasn’t been doing so well since the events of The Avengers, which makes a lot of sense since he went into a wormhole to set off a nuclear bomb and save New York City. The stress and anxiety has also took a toll on the love of his life, Pepper (Gwyneth Paltrow), who can’t seem to take the nervous outbursts and distance of Tony. Their world literally seems to come crashing down with the threat of a new global terrorist, the Mandarin (Sir Ben Kingsley), as bombs begin detonating all over America. Tony wages a one man war against the Mandarin, only to realize that his past is back to haunt him in the form of Aldrich Killian (Guy Pearce), who adds another layer to the Mandarin threat that no one could have expected.

I could start with what I really enjoyed about the movie and how it had some of the best moments than any of the Iron Man movies to date, but I think I’m going to start with something else. Yes, this part will contain spoilers, but it is absolutely essential for me to get this off my arc reactor.

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Ok, so halfway through the movie, Tony Stark finds the Mandarin’s hideout and goes there to kick some terrorist ass. Cool, right? The first meeting! It would be cool, except it turns out that the Mandarin is some low life, junky actor hired by Aldrich Killian to distract the powers that be from his nefarious plot. So… the Mandarin’s a joke? Is that it? He’s not real? Killian’s not the Mandarin, although he has some traits that can be attributed to the Mandarin. The real one isn’t real at all. What in the world were they thinking? At first I couldn’t take this. It was all just too much to handle, but as the movie went on I kinda got used to it and thought it was a little clever. There’s still this taste in the back of my throat that I just can’t get rid of whenever I think about how the Mandarin gets treated.

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The rest of this movie is really intense, though. In fact, I’d say this is the most intense Avengers tie-in to date. There are parts in this movie that really pull on your heart strings and remind you how much you really care for these characters. I can guarantee you that you will forget how to breath during a couple of Iron Man 3‘s more intense moments. Shane Black is an accomplished director who has a knack of creating action films that are charged with humor, his most popular being the Lethal Weapon series. My personal favorite of his is Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. This movie is loaded with humor, even at the heaviest of moments just to remind us that Tony has it under control.

But he really doesn’t have it under control. The most effective scenes are the intimate moments of weakness that we very rarely see with Stark. The past three movies that he’s been in, he’s been the overconfident one who knows how to handle a situation. In Iron Man 3, there were times where I really didn’t think he was going to make it through this whole thing ok. That’s what makes this movie so good. Stark’s character is built to such a degree that I’m really curious where they’re going to go from here.

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Is Iron Man 3 better than the first? It just may be, if not, it’s very close. There’s only one glaring, obnoxious problem in the movie that I’m still very unsure of. The rest of the movie is top notch summer entertainment. I can’t really let one thing bring the entire movie down. Proportionally, that just doesn’t make sense. As a start to the summer blockbuster, it’s great and puts me right in the mood for the new Thor movie. Let’s keep these superheroes coming.