Tag Archives: tom wilkinson

The Samaritan – Review

22 Mar

It’s totally cool to take certain plot devices, concepts, and styles from other movies of the past. Part of the fun of watching movies is seeing styles evolve over the years. I’ve noticed that I’ve been reviewing a lot of neo noir movies recently, and I’m continuing this streak with David Weaver’s 2012 film, The Samaritan. Now, when I say that it’s fine for film makers to borrow from other movies in order to tell their stories, I mean it. The Samaritan, on the other handis pretty much just a walking cliche. Still, for being a B-movie of no consequence, it was still pretty entertaining to watch.

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Foley (Samuel L. Jackson) is an expert grifter who’s just got finished serving a 25 year prison sentence for murdering his old partner. Upon his release, Foley is determined to give up his life of crime and find a more decent way of making a living; a decision that is both made up of overwhelming guilt and logic. While trying to create a better life for himself, he continues to be harassed by Ethan (Luke Kirby), his ex-partner’s son who wants him to be part of a grift on a crime lord Xavier (Tom Wilkinson), and a prostitute desperate for Foley’s affection, Iris (Ruth Negga). While Foley begins forming a relationship with Iris, Evan starts coming at him much harder with his million dollar plan, but it isn’t until Evan drops an earth shattering secret that Foley decides to drop his plan for a new life and dive head first into his last and most dangerous grift.

So, a criminal who has been to prison is trying to reform his life but once again, and unwillingly, gets sucked back into a life of crime. This is a story that’s been told over and over again. This isn’t a bad thing. It’s a classic tale that can be used time and again with different circumstances and events to make it still interesting. In this regard, The Samaritan sort of succeeds and sort of fails. It succeeds because there are a lot of twists, turns, and finely acted characters that kept my attention throughout most of the film. It fails because while there are a lot of different things layered on top of the classic crime tale, they are all pulled straight from other movies so that there’s nearly nothing new or original in the entire movie.

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The casting and performances of the actors is one of those things that really got me into the movie. Samuel L. Jackson gives an outstanding performance as Foley. The role seems to have been written just for him and he fits it like a glove. It was also cool to see Ruth Negga in a more dramatic role outside of her part in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and I thought she did a fine job as Iris. Luke Kirby and Tom Wilkinson ham up their villainous roles, as well, which makes them very easy to hate and it so much easier to root for Foley. This isn’t exactly a well written movie so it was good to see all of these fine actors really pull together and professionally handle some of the ridiculous dialogue and make the best out of what was given to them.

One of the main problems I have with The Samaritan is how long it takes to really get going. The real action and bulk of the story doesn’t start until after the half hour point, which means that there’s a lot of story crammed into a span of less then an hour. This made the first half of the movie feel really slow and the second half disjointed. Luckily, there are some pretty cool scenes throughout the movie and the climax was very satisfying to watch. It would have just been a much smoother ride had the movie been longer or if there wasn’t so many twists and turns mushed together in such a short time period.

The Samaritan isn’t a movie that I’m going to be talking about for the rest of my life, nor is it one that I’d put on again to watch anytime soon. There’s a lot of flaws with the movie but there are also some positive elements going for it that make it pretty entertaining. It’s a very simple movie that’s borrowed from films that have come before it to the point where it’s noticeable. Still, I can’t really say that this is a bad movie at all. It’s certainly an acceptable way to kill some time, but you really don’t need to go out searching for it.

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Selma – Review

14 Feb

It’s a fact to say that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is one of the most important historical figures of the past 100 years. The victories he won and the lengths he went to to secure those victories are incredible accounts of perseverance and bravery, so it’s kind of strange that Hollywood hasn’t really released any films that show his accomplishments. I mean, how many people saw that 2001 release Boycott? Luckily now we have a movie that not only shows Martin Luther King as an activist and a soldier for equality, but also a human being who faced despicable threats of violence to achieve basic human rights.

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In 1964, the Civil Rights Movement has been going strong, but African Americans are still restricted through stringent laws from being able to freely vote. That combined with a bombing of a church pushes Martin Luther King (David Oyelowo) and other activists to travel to Selma and begin a protest for the right to vote. President Lyndon B. Johnson (Tom Wilkinson), after talking with King, feels a reluctant need to help, but feels confined to dealing with other national problems. King then feels that the only way to get Johnson’s attention and the attention of Americans is to push through lines of police, face beatings from the vicious officer, and march to Montgomery, Alabama in protest. As the planning begins, and violence against African Americans intensifies, King begins to fear that this plan may not be feasible and victory impossible to reach.

After thinking about this film, I’ve really come to respect it. As I was watching I kept seeing some major flaws in it that really brought down the entire experience, but they aren’t enough to completely ruin the movie. Most of the problems that I have are with the screenwriting and the pacing. There are many really intense scenes involving the politics that King had to work with but also really moving scenes involving the protests and marches. In between those, however, there are a lot of scenes that just don’t move really well and are filled with melodrama that I just didn’t need. I understand that they were trying to humanize King, but that happened in much better scenes throughout the movie. The scenes that they were trying to humanize him with came of as slow, fake, and overly dramatic.

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So despite there being scenes in this movie, a lot of scenes actually, that didn’t really serve a purpose or weren’t executed well, there were much more powerful scenes to counterbalance them. Selma is one of the more intense movies of 2014, and I say that with the utmost confidence. The terrible thing is that all of this really happened (despite some minor historical accuracies) and it happened in the not too distant past. The first attempted march to Montgomery is actually one of the most startling scenes I’ve seen in recent film making. Director Ava DuVernay did a great job at making history seem to come to life on the screen with cinematography that looks like it could have been ripped right from a moving history book.

I can’t really talk about Selma without mentioning David Oyelowo’s brilliant performance as Martin Luther King. It’s even more impressive considering Oyelowo is a British actor and how well he nails the accent and also King’s way of speaking. The entire cast is all really good, but it really is Oyelowo’s performance that stands out over everyone. Now that I’ve seen the movie, it’s pretty fair to say that he definitely got snubbed at a Best Actor nomination.

Selma may not be my favorite movie of the year or even the best movie of the year, but it is one of the more impressive films of the year. There’s a lot to really love and appreciate with this movie, but there’s also a lot more work that could have been done in trimming up the screenplay and getting rid of some scenes that didn’t really need to be in there. That being said, there are a lot of those unimportant and relatively boring scenes, which almost spoils the entire movie, but luckily there are enough really exceptional and powerful scenes that help work against them. Even though this film is flawed, the history that it presents and how well it presents it should make Selma required viewing.

The Exorcism of Emily Rose – Review

9 May

Believe in it or not, the concept of being possessed and needing some sort of holy man drive whatever all fiction has taken hold of your being is a pretty bizarre and terrifying. When The Exorcist was released in 1973, people were blown through the theatre walls and it was called one of, if not, the scariest films ever made. Now, it’s pretty much a guarantee that we will see an exorcism movie at least once a year. They have become a dime a dozen. In 2005, when The Exorcism of Emily Rose was released, this wasn’t yet the case, making this movie an original and surprisingly dramatic piece of film making about innocence, morality, and personal beliefs.

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Father Richard Moore (Tom Wilkinson) is charged with criminal negligence in the death of Emily Rose (Jennifer Carpenter), a nineteen year old girl believed to have been possessed and put under the care of Father Moore. Defending him is a rising star lawyer, Erin Bruner (Laura Linney), who is an agnostic who is only taking the job to get her name on the law firm and establish herself as an accomplished defense lawyer. Through a series of flashbacks and witness recounts, the story of Emily Rose is slowly put together, and Bruner’s beliefs are tested when what she thought was real melts away with this supernatural possibilities taking over her life.

The first thing that really sticks out about The Exorcism of Emily Rose is the depth that this story is willing to go.  The focal point of the story could have easily been the exorcism itself, and filled with really crazy exorcism scenes  which would have helped in selling tickets and surging the audience’s adrenaline. Instead, Scott Derrikson chose to take a more dramatic approach which really forces the audiences to think about their own beliefs and open their minds up to greater possibilities than what they really think is true. The same thing can sort of be said about The Last Exorcism, but that movie got to be so overblown by the end, I wasn’t really doing any introspection.

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Still though, the scenes that did show Emily Rose and her possession were top notch horror. Jennifer Carpenter gives an absolutely outstanding performance both vocally and physically. A lot of the vocals are created in post production with audio layering, but when she contorts her body in all the crazy positions that we see, it’s just her. Even something as simple as a hand gesture is stiffened and gives off this really creepy vibe that is necessary in movies like this. These scenes are also very important in ensuring that the more drama oriented court room scenes have some points of reference and really balance out the movie.

The scenes in the courtroom are also really good, but do suffer from some heavy handed dialogue and some acting that is just a little off from some of the more minor characters. Even some of the main characters like Bruner and Father Moore have some over the top dialogue that wouldn’t have worked if the actors saying them weren’t as serious and into their roles like Linney and Wilkinson. Hearing them sometimes would pull me out of the movie and make me think, “no one would actually say that.” What is cool about these scenes is that they don’t fall into pits of cliches and the proceedings can be pretty unpredictable. The ending is so unpredictable that I still don’t really buy it, and it would have been better for the writers to stick a bit closer to the actual history.

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The Exorcism of Emily Rose wasn’t so much an entertaining movie as it was an intellectually engaging one. That seems sort of odd to say about a movie that is about an exorcism, but again, this was before the time that one was pretty much release every year. It’s more than just a courtroom drama and an exorcism movie. It’s a clever combination of the two that will force the viewer to look inside themselves and see what they actually believe. Any movie that can shake someone up so much has to be good, and that’s what this movie is. The Exorcism of Emily Rose is a genuinely good movie.